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Epidemiology and genetic diversity of Taenia asiatica: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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44 Dimensions

Readers on

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92 Mendeley
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Title
Epidemiology and genetic diversity of Taenia asiatica: a systematic review
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1756-3305-7-45
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anita Ale, Bjorn Victor, Nicolas Praet, Sarah Gabriël, Niko Speybroeck, Pierre Dorny, Brecht Devleesschauwer

Abstract

Taenia asiatica has made a remarkable journey through the scientific literature of the past 50 years, starting with the paradoxical observation of high prevalences of T. saginata-like tapeworms in non-beef consuming populations, to the full description of its mitochondrial genome. Experimental studies conducted in the 1980s and 1990s have made it clear that the life cycle of T. asiatica is comparable to that of T. saginata, except for pigs being the preferential intermediate host and liver the preferential location of the cysts. Whether or not T. asiatica can cause human cysticercosis, as is the case for Taenia solium, remains unclear. Given the specific conditions needed to complete its life cycle, in particular the consumption of raw or poorly cooked pig liver, the transmission of T. asiatica shows an important ethno-geographical association. So far, T. asiatica has been identified in Taiwan, South Korea, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, south-central China, Vietnam, Japan and Nepal. Especially this last observation indicates that its distribution is not restricted to South-East-Asia, as was thought so far. Indeed, the molecular tools developed over the last 20 years have made it increasingly possible to differentiate T. asiatica from other taeniids. Such tools also indicated that T. asiatica is related more closely to T. saginata than to T. solium, feeding the debate on its taxonomic status as a separate species versus a subspecies of T. saginata. Furthermore, the genetic diversity within T. asiatica appears to be very minimal, indicating that this parasite may be on the verge of extinction. However, recent studies have identified potential hybrids between T. asiatica and T. saginata, reopening the debate on the genetic diversity of T. asiatica and its status as a separate species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 92 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 90 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 23%
Researcher 16 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 5%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 17 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 23%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 15 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 4%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 18 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 November 2014.
All research outputs
#3,487,965
of 12,451,686 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#802
of 3,208 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,172
of 205,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#6
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,451,686 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,208 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,110 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.