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Differentiation of RPE cells from integration-free iPS cells and their cell biological characterization

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

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70 Mendeley
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Title
Differentiation of RPE cells from integration-free iPS cells and their cell biological characterization
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13287-017-0652-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roni A. Hazim, Saravanan Karumbayaram, Mei Jiang, Anupama Dimashkie, Vanda S. Lopes, Douran Li, Barry L. Burgess, Preethi Vijayaraj, Jackelyn A. Alva-Ornelas, Jerome A. Zack, Donald B. Kohn, Brigitte N. Gomperts, April D. Pyle, William E. Lowry, David S. Williams

Abstract

Dysfunction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is implicated in numerous forms of retinal degeneration. The readily accessible environment of the eye makes it particularly suitable for the transplantation of RPE cells, which can now be derived from autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), to treat retinal degeneration. For RPE transplantation to become feasible in the clinic, patient-specific somatic cells should be reprogrammed to iPSCs without the introduction of reprogramming genes into the genome of the host cell, and then subsequently differentiated into RPE cells that are well characterized for safety and functionality prior to transplantation. We have reprogrammed human dermal fibroblasts to iPSCs using nonintegrating RNA, and differentiated the iPSCs toward an RPE fate (iPSC-RPE), under Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compatible conditions. Using highly sensitive assays for cell polarity, structure, organelle trafficking, and function, we found that iPSC-RPE cells in culture exhibited key characteristics of native RPE. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time with any stem cell-derived RPE cell that live cells are able to support dynamic organelle transport. This highly sensitive test is critical for RPE cells intended for transplantation, since defects in intracellular motility have been shown to promote RPE pathogenesis akin to that found in macular degeneration. To test their capabilities for in-vivo transplantation, we injected the iPSC-RPE cells into the subretinal space of a mouse model of retinal degeneration, and demonstrated that the transplanted cells are capable of rescuing lost RPE function. This report documents the successful generation, under GMP-compatible conditions, of human iPSC-RPE cells that possess specific characteristics of healthy RPE. The report adds to a growing literature on the utility of human iPSC-RPE cells for cell culture investigations on pathogenicity and for therapeutic transplantation, by corroborating findings of others, and providing important new information on essential RPE cell biological properties.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Master 5 7%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 14 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 11%
Neuroscience 7 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 19 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2018.
All research outputs
#7,338,730
of 13,017,042 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#501
of 1,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,721
of 272,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#18
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,017,042 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,116 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.