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Association between baseline psychological attributes and mental health outcomes after soldiers returned from deployment

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 424)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
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Title
Association between baseline psychological attributes and mental health outcomes after soldiers returned from deployment
Published in
BMC Psychology, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40359-017-0201-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu-Chu Shen, Jeremy Arkes, Paul B. Lester

Abstract

Psychological health is vital for effective employees, especially in stressful occupations like military and public safety sectors. Yet, until recently little empirical work has made the link between requisite psychological resources and important mental health outcomes across time in those sectors. In this study we explore the association between 14 baseline psychological health attributes (such as adaptability, coping ability, optimism) and mental health outcomes following exposure to combat deployment. Retrospective analysis of all U.S. Army soldiers who enlisted between 2009 and 2012 and took the Global Assessment Tools (GAT) before their first deployment (n = 63,186). We analyze whether a soldier screened positive for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after returning from deployment using logistic regressions. Our key independent variables are 14 psychological attributes based on GAT, and we control for relevant demographic and service characteristics. In addition, we generate a composite risk score for each soldier based on the predicted probabilities from the above multivariate model using just baseline psychological attributes and demographic information. Comparing those who scored in the bottom 5 percentile of each attribute to those in the top 95 percentile, the odds ratio of post-deployment depression symptoms ranges from 1.21 (95% CI 1.06, 1.40) for organizational trust to 1.73 (CI 1.52, 1.97) for baseline depression. The odds ratio of positive screening of PTSD symptoms ranges from 1.22 for family support (CI 1.08, 1.38) to 1.51 for baseline depression (CI 1.32, 1.73). The risk profile analysis shows that 31% of those who screened positive for depression and 27% of those who screened positive for PTSD were concentrated among the top 5% high risk population. A set of validated, self-reported questions administered early in a soldier's career can predict future mental health problems, and can be used to improve workforce fit and provide significant financial benefits to organizations that do so.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 17%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 21 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 8%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 5%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 28 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 96. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 February 2018.
All research outputs
#244,479
of 16,752,553 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#18
of 424 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,674
of 283,671 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,752,553 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 424 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,671 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them