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Contributing factors of elective surgical case cancellation: a retrospective cross-sectional study at a single-site hospital

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Surgery, September 2017
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Title
Contributing factors of elective surgical case cancellation: a retrospective cross-sectional study at a single-site hospital
Published in
BMC Surgery, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12893-017-0296-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaiye Yu, Xiaolei Xie, Li Luo, Renrong Gong

Abstract

Case cancellation (CC) has significant impact on the efficiency of operating room (OR) management, which can be mitigated by taking preventive measures. In this study, using the data of the West China Hospital (WCH), we identified the effect of contributing factors and recommended hospital interventions to facilitate CC prevention. We conducted a retrospective review of 11,331 elective surgical cases from January 1 to December 31, 2014. CC reasons were grouped into six categories. The methods of descriptive statistics and hypothesis test were used to identify the effect of factors. CC reasons (746) were divided into six broad categories: workup related (preoperative diagnostic assessment issues or sudden medical condition changes) (25.8%), non-specified reasons (25.8%), coordination issues (15.1%), patient related (13.0%), support system issues (11.8%), and doctor related (8.5%). The types of the most frequently performed operations are identified, as well as their CRs. The cancellation rate (CR) of males was lower than that of females (16.7% to 18.3%). A large difference in the CRs existed among doctors. The CR on Monday was significantly higher than the other four weekdays. Workup related issues, the types of procedures, the menstrual cycle of females, highly imbalanced CRs among doctors, and tendency of cancellation on Monday are the major identified factors, which account for a significant amount of preventable cancellations. It is suggested that corresponding hospital interventions can reduce CR and improve OR efficiency, including maintaining effective coordination, good communication and well-designed preoperative assessment processes, focusing on the type of procedures which are more time-consuming and complex, paying special attention to the physiology of females during surgery planning, taking measures to reduce CR of top eight doctors, and improving surgery scheduling on Monday.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 16%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Other 4 5%
Other 15 20%
Unknown 24 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 21%
Social Sciences 3 4%
Engineering 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 1%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 28 37%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2017.
All research outputs
#18,573,839
of 23,005,189 outputs
Outputs from BMC Surgery
#622
of 1,332 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#242,465
of 316,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Surgery
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,005,189 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,332 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,079 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.