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PKR involvement in Alzheimer’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, October 2017
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Title
PKR involvement in Alzheimer’s disease
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13195-017-0308-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacques Hugon, François Mouton-Liger, Julien Dumurgier, Claire Paquet

Abstract

Brain lesions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by Aβ accumulation, neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal vanishing. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, Aβ1-42 oligomers could trigger a neurotoxic cascade with kinase activation that leads to tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Detrimental pathways that are associated with kinase activation could also be linked to the triggering of direct neuronal death, the production of free radicals, and neuroinflammation. Among these kinases, PKR (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase 2) is a pro-apoptotic enzyme that inhibits translation and that has been implicated in several molecular pathways that lead to AD brain lesions and disturbed memory formation. PKR accumulates in degenerating neurons and is activated by Aβ1-42 neurotoxicity. It might modulate Aβ synthesis through BACE 1 induction. PKR is increased in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment and can induce the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways leading to TNFα and IL1-β production. In addition, experimentally, PKR seems to down-regulate the molecular processes of memory consolidation. This review highlights the major findings linking PKR and abnormal brain metabolism associated with AD lesions. Studying the detrimental role of PKR signaling in AD could pave the way for a neuroprotective strategy in which PKR inhibition could reduce neuronal demise and alleviate cognitive decline as well as the cumbersome burden of AD for patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Other 14 21%
Unknown 21 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 15%
Neuroscience 10 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 9 14%
Unknown 25 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2017.
All research outputs
#9,113,628
of 11,880,222 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#433
of 498 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,906
of 272,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#15
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,880,222 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 498 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.