↓ Skip to main content

Low mood in a sample of 5–12 year-old child psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Low mood in a sample of 5–12 year-old child psychiatric patients: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13034-017-0183-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katri Maasalo, Jaana Wessman, Eeva T. Aronen, Maasalo, Katri, Wessman, Jaana, Aronen, Eeva T.

Abstract

Not much is known about low mood and its associates in child psychiatric patients. In this study, we examined the prevalence of low mood, how it associates with disruptive behaviour, and affects clinician-rated global functioning in child psychiatric outpatients. The study population consisted of 862 5-12 year-old child psychiatric patients. The study sample was a subsample of all 1251 patients attending a child psychiatric outpatient clinic at Helsinki University Hospital in 2013-2015 formed by excluding 4 year-old and 13 year-old patients and those with missing or incomplete data. The parent-rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, collected as part of the routine clinical baseline measure, was used as a measure of psychiatric symptoms. The diagnoses were set according to ICD-10 by the clinician in charge after an initial evaluation period. The Children's Global Assessment Scale (CGAS) score set by clinicians provided the measure of the patients' global functioning. All information for the study was collected from hospital registers. Associations between emotional symptoms and conduct problems/hyperactivity scores were examined using ordinal regression in univariate and multivariate models, controlling for age and sex. The independent samples T test was used to compare the CGAS values of patient groups with low/normal mood. In our sample, 512 children (59.4%) showed low mood. In multivariate ordinal regression analysis, low mood associated with conduct problems (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.39-2.67), but no association was found between low mood and hyperactivity. Low mood was prevalent among children with oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder (51.8%). The global functioning score CGAS was lower among children with parent-reported low mood (52.21) than among children with normal mood (54.62, p < 0.001). The same was true in the subgroup of patients with no depression diagnosis (54.85 vs. 52.82, p = 0.001). Low mood is prevalent in child psychiatric outpatients regardless of depression diagnosis and it has a negative effect on global functioning. Low mood and behavioural problems are often associated. It is important to pay attention to low mood in all child psychiatric patients. We recommend prevention measures and low-threshold services for children with low mood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 28%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 15 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Neuroscience 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 10 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#11,040,275
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#373
of 474 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#187,875
of 276,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#5
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 474 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,923 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.