↓ Skip to main content

Porcine model of progressive cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis with secondary postcapillary pulmonary hypertension

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Porcine model of progressive cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis with secondary postcapillary pulmonary hypertension
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12967-017-1299-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariann Gyöngyösi, Noemi Pavo, Dominika Lukovic, Katrin Zlabinger, Andreas Spannbauer, Denise Traxler, Georg Goliasch, Ljubica Mandic, Jutta Bergler-Klein, Alfred Gugerell, Andras Jakab, Zsuzsanna Szankai, Levente Toth, Rita Garamvölgyi, Gerald Maurer, Frederic Jaisser, Faiez Zannad, Thomas Thum, Sándor Bátkai, Johannes Winkler

Abstract

Meaningful translational large animal models for cardiac diseases are indispensable for studying disease mechanisms, development of novel therapeutic strategies, and evaluation of potential drugs. For induction of heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, a bare metal stent was implanted in the descending aorta of growing pigs (n = 7), inducing pressure stress on the left ventricle (group HYPI). The constant stent size in growing pigs resulted in antegrade partial obstruction of the aortic flow with a gradual increase in afterload. Five pigs with sham intervention served as control. Serial haemodynamic, pressure-volume loop measurements and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) were performed to detect developing pressure overload of the LV and cardiac MRI with late enhancement for measuring LV and RV mass and ejection fraction. At 5-month follow-up, CT and contrast aortography, and intraluminal echocardiography confirmed aortic isthmus stenosis with a mean trans-stenotic gradient of 64 ± 13.9 mmHg. Invasive haemodynamic measurements revealed a secondary increase in pulmonary artery pressure (44.6 ± 5.1 vs 25.9 ± 6.2 mmHg, HYPI vs control, p < 0.05). TTE and ex vivo analyses confirmed severe concentric LV hypertrophy (mean circumferential wall thickness, 19.4 ± 3.1, n = 7 vs 11.4 ± 1.0 mm, n = 5, HYPI vs controls, p < 0.05). The LV and RV mass increased significantly, paralleled by increased isovolumic relaxation constant (tau). Histological analyses confirmed substantial fibrosis and myocyte hypertrophy in both LV and RV. Expressions of ANP, BNP, and miRNA-29a were up-regulated, while SERCA2a and miRNA-1 were down-regulated. Plasma NGAL levels increased gradually, while the elevation of NT-proBNP was detected only at the 5-month FUP. These data prove that percutaneous artificial aortic stenosis in pigs is useful for inducing clinically relevant progredient heart failure based on myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Master 7 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 24 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 10%
Engineering 7 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Neuroscience 3 4%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 28 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2018.
All research outputs
#8,300,202
of 13,243,534 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1,492
of 2,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#156,935
of 273,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,243,534 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,611 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,620 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.