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Yeast histone H3 lysine 4 demethylase Jhd2 regulates mitotic ribosomal DNA condensation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, September 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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3 tweeters

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Title
Yeast histone H3 lysine 4 demethylase Jhd2 regulates mitotic ribosomal DNA condensation
Published in
BMC Biology, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12915-014-0075-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hong-Yeoul Ryu, Seong Hoon Ahn

Abstract

BackgroundNucleolar rDNA is tightly associated with silent heterochromatin, which is important for rDNA stability, nucleolar integration, and cellular senescence. Two pathways have been described that lead to rDNA silencing in yeast: 1) the RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit) complex, which is composed of Net1, Sir2, and Cdc14 and is required for Sir2-dependent rDNA silencing; and 2) the Sir2-independent silencing mechanism, which involves the Tof2 and Tof2-copurified complex, made up of Lrs4 and Csm1. Here, we present evidence that changes in histone H3 lysine methylation levels distinctly regulate rDNA silencing by recruiting different silencing proteins to rDNA, thereby contributing to rDNA silencing and nucleolar organization in yeast.ResultsWe found that Lys4, Lys79, and Lys36 methylation within histone H3 acts as a bivalent marker for the regulation of rDNA recombination and RENT complex-mediated rDNA silencing, both of which are Sir2-dependent pathways. By contrast, we found that Jhd2, an evolutionarily conserved JARID1 family H3 Lys4 demethylase, effects all states of methylated H3K4 within the NTS regions of rDNA and that its activity is required for the regulation of rDNA silencing in a Sir2-independent manner. In this context, Jhd2 regulates rDNA recombination through the Tof2/Csm1/Lrs4 pathway and prevents excessive recruitment of Tof2, Csm1/Lrs4 and condensin subunits to the replication fork barrier (RFB) site within the NTS1 region. Our FISH analyses further demonstrate that the demethylase activity of Jhd2 regulates mitotic rDNA condensation and that JHD2-deficient cells contain the mostly hypercondensed rDNA mislocalized away from the nuclear periphery.ConclusionsOur results show that yeast Jhd2, which demethylates histone H3 Lys4 near the rDNA locus, regulates rDNA repeat stability and rDNA silencing in a Sir2-independent manner by maintaining Csm1/Lrs4 and condensin association with rDNA regions during mitosis. These data suggest that Jhd2-mediated alleviation of excessive Csm1/Lrs4 or condensin at the NTS1 region of rDNA is required for the integrity of rDNA repeats and proper rDNA silencing during mitosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 43 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 28%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 52%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 28%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Chemistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2014.
All research outputs
#2,006,531
of 5,036,385 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#491
of 706 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,619
of 137,268 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#25
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,385 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 706 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 137,268 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.