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Echoes of old HIV paradigms: reassessing the problem of engaging men in HIV testing and treatment through women’s perspectives

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

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21 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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110 Mendeley
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Title
Echoes of old HIV paradigms: reassessing the problem of engaging men in HIV testing and treatment through women’s perspectives
Published in
Reproductive Health, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12978-017-0387-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leila Katirayi, Addmore Chadambuka, Auxilia Muchedzi, Allan Ahimbisibwe, Reuben Musarandega, Godfrey Woelk, Thorkild Tylleskar, Karen Marie Moland

Abstract

With the introduction of 2016 World Health Organization guidelines recommending universal antiretroviral therapy (ART), there has been increased recognition of the lack of men engaging in HIV testing and treatment. Studies in sub-Saharan Africa indicate there have been challenges engaging men in HIV testing and HIV-positive men into treatment. This qualitative study explored women's perspective of their male partner's attitudes towards HIV and ART and how it shapes woman's experience with ART. Data were collected through in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with HIV-positive pregnant and postpartum women on Option B+ and health care workers in Malawi and Zimbabwe. In Malawi, 19 in-depth interviews and 12 focus group discussions were conducted from September-December 2013. In Zimbabwe, 15 in-depth interviews and 21 focus-group discussions were conducted from July 2014-March 2014. The findings highlighted that many men discourage their partners from initiating or adhering to ART. One of the main findings indicated that despite the many advancements in HIV care and ART regimens, there are still many lingering negative beliefs about HIV and ART from the earlier days of the epidemic. In addition to existing theories explaining men's resistance to/absence in HIV testing and treatment as a threat to their masculinity or because of female-focused health facilities, this paper argues that men's aversion to HIV may be a result of old beliefs about HIV and ART which have not been addressed. Due to lack of accurate and up to date information about HIV and ART, many men discourage their female partners from initiating and adhering to ART. The effect of lingering and outdated beliefs about HIV and ART needs to be addressed through strengthened communication about developments in HIV care and treatment. Universal ART offers a unique opportunity to curb the epidemic, but successful implementation of these new guidelines is dependent on ART initiation and adherence by both women and men. Strengthening men's understanding about HIV and ART will greatly enhance women's ability to initiate and adhere to ART and improve men's health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 110 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 19%
Researcher 18 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 20 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 28 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 22%
Social Sciences 8 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 5%
Psychology 4 4%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 26 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2018.
All research outputs
#1,855,873
of 19,491,641 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#179
of 1,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,861
of 293,607 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,491,641 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,233 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,607 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them