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Investigation of Salmonella Enteritidis outbreaks in South Africa using multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis, 2013-2015

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
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Title
Investigation of Salmonella Enteritidis outbreaks in South Africa using multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis, 2013-2015
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2751-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Munyadziwa Muvhali, Anthony Marius Smith, Andronica Moipone Rakgantso, Karen Helena Keddy

Abstract

Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (Salmonella Enteritidis) has become a significant pathogen in South Africa, and the need for improved molecular surveillance of this pathogen has become important. Over the years, multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis (MLVA) has become a valuable molecular subtyping technique for Salmonella, particularly for highly homogenic serotypes such as Salmonella Enteritidis. This study describes the use of MLVA in the molecular epidemiological investigation of outbreak isolates in South Africa. Between the years 2013 and 2015, the Centre for Enteric Diseases (CED) received 39 Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from seven foodborne illness outbreaks, which occurred in six provinces. MLVA was performed on all isolates. Three MLVA profiles (MLVA profiles 21, 22 and 28) were identified among the 39 isolates. MLVA profile 28 accounted for 77% (30/39) of the isolates. Isolates from a single outbreak were grouped into a single MLVA profile. A minimum spanning tree (MST) created from the MLVA data showed a close relationship between MLVA profiles 21, 22 and 28, with a single VNTR locus difference between them. MLVA has proven to be a reliable method for the molecular epidemiological investigation of Salmonella Enteritidis outbreaks in South Africa. These foodborne outbreaks emphasize the importance of the One Health approach as an essential component for combating the spread of zoonotic pathogens such as Salmonella Enteritidis.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 19%
Student > Master 8 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 6%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 11 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2018.
All research outputs
#12,139,116
of 15,923,161 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,712
of 5,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,118
of 281,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#14
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,923,161 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,800 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.