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Innovations to reduce demand and crowding in emergency care; a review study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 1,220)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
twitter
3 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
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Title
Innovations to reduce demand and crowding in emergency care; a review study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13049-014-0055-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suzanne Mason, Gail Mountain, Janette Turner, Mubashir Arain, Eric Revue, Ellen J Weber

Abstract

Emergency Department demand continues to rise in almost all high-income countries, including those with universal coverage and a strong primary care network. Many of these countries have been experimenting with innovative methods to stem demand for acute care, while at the same time providing much needed services that can prevent Emergency Department attendance and later hospital admissions. A large proportion of patients comprise of those with minor illnesses that could potentially be seen by a health care provider in a primary care setting. The increasing number of visits to Emergency Departments not only causes delay in urgent care provision but also increases the overall cost. In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS) has made a number of efforts to strengthen primary healthcare services to increase accessibility to healthcare as well as address patients¿ needs by introducing new urgent care services.In this review, we describe efforts that have been ongoing in the UK and France for over a decade as well as specific programs to target the rising needs of emergency care in both England and France. Like many such programs, there have been successes, failures and unintended consequences. Thus, the urgent care system of other high-income countries can learn from these experiments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 96 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 28%
Researcher 12 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 22 23%
Unknown 12 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 8 8%
Social Sciences 8 8%
Psychology 4 4%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 15 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 95. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2022.
All research outputs
#335,942
of 21,338,015 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#17
of 1,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,718
of 224,683 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,338,015 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,220 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,683 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them