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A comparative effectiveness trial of postoperative management for lumbar spine surgery: changing behavior through physical therapy (CBPT) study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, October 2014
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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225 Mendeley
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Title
A comparative effectiveness trial of postoperative management for lumbar spine surgery: changing behavior through physical therapy (CBPT) study protocol
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2474-15-325
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristin R Archer, Rogelio A Coronado, Christine M Haug, Susan W Vanston, Clinton J Devin, Christopher J Fonnesbeck, Oran S Aaronson, Joseph S Cheng, Richard L Skolasky, Lee H Riley, Stephen T Wegener

Abstract

The United States has the highest rate of lumbar spine surgery in the world, with rates increasing over 200% since 1990. Medicare spends over $1 billion annually on lumbar spine surgery. Despite surgical advances, up to 40% of patients report chronic pain and disability following surgery. Our work has demonstrated that fear of movement is a risk factor for increased pain and disability and decreased physical function in patients following lumbar spine surgery for degenerative conditions. Cognitive-behavioral therapy and self-management treatments have the potential to address psychosocial risk factors and improve outcomes after spine surgery, but are unavailable or insufficiently adapted for postoperative care. Our research team developed a cognitive-behavioral based self-management approach to postoperative rehabilitation (Changing Behavior through Physical Therapy (CBPT)). Pilot testing of the CBPT program demonstrated greater improvement in pain, disability, physical and mental health, and physical performance compared to education. The current study compares which of two treatments provided by telephone - a CBPT Program or an Education Program about postoperative recovery - are more effective for improving patient-centered outcomes in adults following lumbar spine surgery for degenerative conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 225 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 223 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 18%
Student > Bachelor 29 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 10%
Researcher 20 9%
Other 39 17%
Unknown 47 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 66 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 45 20%
Psychology 29 13%
Sports and Recreations 9 4%
Social Sciences 8 4%
Other 14 6%
Unknown 54 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,514,736
of 5,094,627 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#911
of 1,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,347
of 140,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#36
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,094,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,703 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 140,106 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.