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Differential microRNA expression following infection with a mouse-adapted, highly virulent avian H5N2 virus

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, September 2014
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Title
Differential microRNA expression following infection with a mouse-adapted, highly virulent avian H5N2 virus
Published in
BMC Microbiology, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12866-014-0252-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eun-Ji Choi, Hyeun Bum Kim, Yun Hee Baek, Eun-Ha Kim, Philippe Noriel Q Pascua, Su-Jin Park, Hyeok-il Kwon, Gyo-Jin Lim, Semi Kim, Young-Il Kim, Young-Ki Choi

Abstract

BackgroundMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to regulate various biological processes, including expression of cellular gene and virus-induced inflammation. Recently, studies have indicated that some miRNAs could regulate influenza virus replication. Due to differential sensitivities of influenza A virus strains to different species (avian and mammalian), variations in host responses may be observed. Therefore, we investigated and compared the differences in global host miRNA expression in mouse lungs infected with wild type low pathogenicity A/Aquatic bird/Korea/w81/2005 (H5N2) (w81) or mouse-adapted virulent A/Aquatic bird /Korea/ma81/2007 (H5N2) (ma81) virus.ResultsAlthough the mice infected with ma81 exhibited much greater mortality than w81-infected mice, the parental w81 virus induced a higher number of differentially expressed miRNAs compared to the ma81 virus. Between these 2 viruses, a total of 27 and 20 miRNAs were commonly expressed in at 1 dpi and 3 dpi, respectively. It is noteworthy that only 9 miRNAs (miR-100-5p, miR-130a-5p, miR-146b-3p, miR-147-3p, miR-151-5p, miR-155-3p, miR-223-3p, miR-301a-3p, and miR-495-3p) were significantly upregulated in both lungs infected with either wild type w81 or the mouse-adapted ma81 strain at both time points. Notably, expression levels of miR-147-3p, miR-151-5p, miR-155-3p, and miR-223-3p were higher in the lungs of mice infected with the ma81 virus than those infected with the w81 virus. To identify potential roles of these miRNAs in regulating influenza virus replication, each group of mice was intranasally treated with each inhibitor of specifically targeting 4 miRNAs, and then challenged with 5 mouse lethal dose 50% (MLD50) of the virulent ma81 virus on the following day. Although the specific miRNA inhibitors could not completely attenuate mortality or reduce viral replication, the miR-151-5p- and miR-223-3p-inhibitors reduced mortality of inoculated mice to 70% and substantially delayed death.ConclusionsOur results suggest that the mammalian adaptation of avian influenza A virus results in a different miRNA expression pattern in lungs of virus-infected mice compared with its parental strain, and use of specific miRNA inhibitors to target genes associated with the immune response or cell death may affect virulence and virus replication.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 35%
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Other 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 26%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2014.
All research outputs
#3,405,514
of 4,319,462 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#663
of 856 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,165
of 115,508 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#26
of 35 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 856 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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