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Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cattle from the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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Title
Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in cattle from the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12917-017-1220-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tiny Motlatso Hlokwe, Halima Said, Nomakorinte Gcebe

Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the main causative agent of tuberculosis (TB) in human and Mycobacterium bovis commonly causes tuberculosis in animals. Transmission of tuberculosis caused by both pathogens can occur from human to animals and vice versa. In the current study, M. tuberculosis, as confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers targeting 3 regions of difference (RD4, RD9 and RD12) on the genomes, was isolated from cattle originating from two epidemiologically unrelated farms in the Eastern Cape (E.C) Province of South Africa. Although the isolates were genotyped with variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) typing, no detailed epidemiological investigation was carried out on the respective farms to unequivocally confirm or link humans as sources of TB transmission to cattle, a move that would have embraced the 'One Health' concept. In addition, strain comparison with human M. tuberculosis in the database from the E.C Province and other provinces in the country did not reveal any match. This is the first report of cases of M. tuberculosis infection in cattle in South Africa. The VNTR profiles of the M. tuberculosis strains identified in the current study will form the basis for creating M. tuberculosis VNTR database for animals including cattle for future epidemiological studies. Our findings however, call for urgent reinforcement of collaborative efforts between the veterinary and the public health services of the country.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 22%
Student > Master 9 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 12 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2019.
All research outputs
#3,069,533
of 16,188,470 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#210
of 2,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,875
of 282,482 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#1
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,188,470 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,392 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,482 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.