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The river and the sea: fieldwork in human ecology and ethnobiology

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
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Title
The river and the sea: fieldwork in human ecology and ethnobiology
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/1746-4269-10-70
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alpina Begossi

Abstract

This article is a commentary on the experiences that motivated my decision to become a human ecologist and ethnobiologist. These experiences include the pleasure of studying and of having the sense of being within nature, as well as the curiosity towards understanding the world and minds of local people. In particular, such understanding could be driven by addressing the challenging questions that originate in the interactions of such individuals with their natural surroundings. I have been particularly interested in the sea and the riverine forests that are inhabited by coastal or riverine small-scale fishers. Sharing the distinctive world of these fishers enjoyably incited my curiosity and challenged me to understand why fishers and their families 'do as they do' for their livelihoods including their beliefs. This challenge involved understanding the rationality (or the arguments or views) that underlies the decisions these individuals make in their interaction with nature. This curiosity was fundamental to my career choice, as were a number of reading interests. These reading interests included political economy and philosophy; evolution and sociobiology; evolutionary, human, and cultural ecology; cultural transmission; fisheries; local knowledge; ecological economics; and, naturally, ethnobiology.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 6%
Unknown 34 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Researcher 5 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Professor 3 8%
Other 13 36%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 39%
Environmental Science 7 19%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Materials Science 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2014.
All research outputs
#10,409,131
of 18,883,809 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#389
of 694 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,362
of 220,893 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#6
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,883,809 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 694 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 220,893 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.