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Post-trauma morbidity, measured as sick leave, is substantial and influenced by factors unrelated to injury: a retrospective matched observational cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, October 2017
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4 tweeters

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6 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Post-trauma morbidity, measured as sick leave, is substantial and influenced by factors unrelated to injury: a retrospective matched observational cohort study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13049-017-0444-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erik von Oelreich, Mikael Eriksson, Olof Brattström, Andrea Discacciati, Lovisa Strömmer, Anders Oldner, Emma Larsson

Abstract

Mortality as an endpoint has been the focus of trauma research whereas few studies investigate long-term outcomes in terms of morbidity. An adequate analysis of post-injury morbidity includes several dimensions, for this reason sick leave has been used as a proxy for morbidity in the current study. The aim of this retrospective matched observational cohort study was to investigate sick leave before and after trauma and factors associated with prolonged sick leave. Patients from a level one trauma centre 2005-2010 were matched in a 1:5 ratio with uninjured controls. By linkage to national registries, sick leave rates were compared. The association between potential risk factors and full-time sick leave at twelve months post injury, the primary end-point, was examined in trauma patients by logistic regression. Four thousand seven hundred twelve patients and 25,013 controls aged 20-63 were included. Trauma patients had more sick leave both before and after trauma. Age, psychiatric disease, low level of education, serious injury, spinal injury, reduced consciousness at admission, discharge destination other than home, and hospital length of stay >7 days were all associated with the primary end-point. The strongest risk factor was sick leave before trauma; this was also noted in the most seriously injured patients. In this retrospective matched observational cohort study we found a significant long-term morbidity, measured as sick leave, among trauma patients. Compared to controls the difference was maximal early after trauma and sustained throughout the follow up period. In the logistic regression, factors associated with the traumatic injury as well as host factors increased the probability of not returning to work. Full sick leavemonth twelve post injury was strongly associated with pre-injury sick leave but also with age, psychiatric comorbidity, level of education, injury severity, spinal injury, low GCS at admission, length of stay at hospital and discharge to other destination than home. Trauma patients suffer from significant long-term morbidity. The sustained post-trauma morbidity is largely influenced by factors not related to injury per se. These insights enable identification of patients at risk for prolonged sick leave after trauma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 10 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 45%
Psychology 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Engineering 2 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 11 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2017.
All research outputs
#6,761,696
of 12,016,495 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#456
of 745 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,747
of 275,419 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#18
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,016,495 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 745 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,419 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.