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Gastrointestinal parasites in an isolated Norwegian population of wild red deer (Cervus elaphus)

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, October 2014
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Title
Gastrointestinal parasites in an isolated Norwegian population of wild red deer (Cervus elaphus)
Published in
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13028-014-0059-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca K Davidson, Susan J Kutz, Knut Madslien, Eric Hoberg, Kjell Handeland

Abstract

BackgroundThirteen red deer (Cervus elaphus), culled from the isolated population at the Mongstad Oil Refinery, Norway, were investigated for gastrointestinal helminths. These animals, enclosed by the refinery fence, do not have contact with other ruminants and have a high population density considering the available browsing area (1 km2) within the refinery site (3 km2). The population was estimated to be 110-130 at the time of culling.ResultsThe helminth fauna among these sampled red deer was enumerated and species were identified based on morphology. Ostertagia leptospicularis/O. kolchida was detected in 83% [CI 55 - 95%], Spiculopteragia spiculoptera/S. mathevossiani in 92% [CI 65 - 99%] and Trichostrongylus axei in 42%, [CI 19 - 68%] of the abomasa examined. Characterisation of the intestinal parasite fauna revealed Capillaria bovis, Cooperia oncophora, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Trichuris globulosa and tapeworm fragments (presumed anoplocephalids) in seven individuals. Only one calf had an infection with more than one intestinal helminth (tapeworm fragment and Trichuris globulosa). The remaining six deer had single species intestinal infections.No significant age related trends were seen, with the exception of higher intensity of infection of T. axei in yearlings relative to other age classes. Assessment of abomasal parasite burden and body condition revealed no significant trends. In calves, statistically non-significant correlation was seen between increased parasite burden and decreased slaughter weight, whilst the opposite was seen in adults with the heaviest adults exhibiting the higher burdens. Given the small sample size the trends that were seen need further investigation. The parasite burden was aggregated with three adult red deer harbouring 75% of the total abomasal parasite count.ConclusionThis isolated population was parasitised by a reduced subset of gastrointestinal nematodes typical of this cervid across an extensive geographic range in Eurasia. The intensity and abundance of abomasal nematodes was higher in this isolated population than reported in similar studies of red deer populations across Europe.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Austria 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 47%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 12%
Environmental Science 3 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Chemical Engineering 1 3%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2014.
All research outputs
#2,877,839
of 4,507,778 outputs
Outputs from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#150
of 285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,864
of 121,053 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#12
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,778 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 285 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,053 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.