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The epidemiology and transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the community in Singapore: study protocol for a longitudinal household study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
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1 tweeter

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Title
The epidemiology and transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the community in Singapore: study protocol for a longitudinal household study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2793-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nivedita Shankar, Angela Li Ping Chow, Jolene Oon, Li Yang Hsu, Brenda Ang, Junxiong Pang, Paola Florez De Sessions, Balamurugan Periaswamy, Paul A. Tambyah, Desmond B. Teo, Clarence C. Tam

Abstract

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common multidrug-resistant organisms in healthcare settings worldwide, but little is known about MRSA transmission outside of acute healthcare settings especially in Asia. We describe the methods for a prospective longitudinal study of MRSA prevalence and transmission. MRSA-colonized individuals were identified from MRSA admission screening at two tertiary hospitals and recruited together with their household contacts. Participants submitted self-collected nasal, axilla and groin (NAG) swabs by mail for MRSA culture at baseline and monthly thereafter for 6 months. A comparison group of households of MRSA-negative patients provided swab samples at one time point. In a validation sub-study, separate swabs from each site were collected from randomly selected individuals, to compare MRSA detection rates between swab sites, and between samples collected by participants versus those collected by trained research staff. Information on each participant's demographic information, medical status and medical history, past healthcare facilities usage and contacts, and personal interactions with others were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Understanding the dynamics of MRSA persistence and transmission in the community is crucial to devising and evaluating successful MRSA control strategies. Close contact with MRSA colonized patients may to be important for MRSA persistence in the community; evidence from this study on the extent of community MRSA could inform the development of household- or community-based interventions to reduce MRSA colonization of close contacts and subsequent re-introduction of MRSA into healthcare settings. Analysis of longitudinal data using whole-genome sequencing will yield further information regarding MRSA transmission within households, with significant implications for MRSA infection control outside acute hospital settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 18%
Researcher 8 15%
Other 4 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 15 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 5%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 20 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,643,827
of 12,002,078 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,863
of 4,443 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#238,709
of 284,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#240
of 296 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 4,443 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 296 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.