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Phytochemical-rich foods inhibit the growth of pathogenic trichomonads

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies, September 2017
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Title
Phytochemical-rich foods inhibit the growth of pathogenic trichomonads
Published in
BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-1967-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sabrina M. Noritake, Jenny Liu, Sierra Kanetake, Carol E. Levin, Christina Tam, Luisa W. Cheng, Kirkwood M. Land, Mendel Friedman

Abstract

Plants produce secondary metabolites that often possess widespread bioactivity, and are then known as phytochemicals. We previously determined that several phytochemical-rich food-derived preparations were active against pathogenic foodborne bacteria. Trichomonads produce disease (trichomoniasis) in humans and in certain animals. Trichomonads are increasingly becoming resistant to conventional modes of treatment. It is of interest to test bioactive, natural compounds for efficacy against these pathogens. Using a cell assay, black tea, green tea, grape, pomegranate, and jujube extracts, as well as whole dried jujube were tested against three trichomonads: Trichomonas vaginalis strain G3 (found in humans), Tritrichomonas foetus strain D1 (found in cattle), and Tritrichomonas foetus-like organism strain C1 (found in cats). The most effective of the test substances was subsequently tested against two metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis strains, and on normal mucosal flora. Black tea extract inhibited all the tested trichomonads, but was most effective against the T. vaginalis organisms. Inhibition by black tea was correlated with the total and individual theaflavin content of the two tea extracts determined by HPLC. Metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis strains were also inhibited by the black tea extract. The response of the organisms to the remaining preparations was variable and unique. We observed no effect of the black tea extract on common normal flora bacteria. The results suggest that the black tea, and to a lesser degree green tea, grape seed, and pomegranate extracts might present possible natural alternative therapeutic agents to treat Trichomonas vaginalis infections in humans and the related trichomonad infections in animals, without negatively affecting the normal flora.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 25%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Unspecified 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 16%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Unspecified 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 9 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2020.
All research outputs
#18,174,053
of 22,489,892 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies
#2,319
of 3,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,633
of 293,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary Medicine and Therapies
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,489,892 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,303 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,831 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them