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How effective are family-based and institutional nutrition interventions in improving children’s diet and health? A systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
229 Mendeley
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Title
How effective are family-based and institutional nutrition interventions in improving children’s diet and health? A systematic review
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4795-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew P. Black, Katina D’Onise, Robyn McDermott, Hassan Vally, Kerin O’Dea

Abstract

Effective strategies to improve dietary intake in young children are a priority to reduce the high prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases in adulthood. This study aimed to assess the impact of family-based and school/preschool nutrition programs on the health of children aged 12 or younger, including the sustainability of these impacts and the relevance to socio-economic inequalities. A systematic review of literature published from 1980 to December 2014 was undertaken. Randomised controlled trials involving families with children aged up to 12 years in high income countries were included. The primary outcomes were dietary intake and health status. Results were presented in a narrative synthesis due to the heterogeneity of the interventions and outcomes. The systematic search and assessment identified 39 eligible studies. 82% of these studies were set in school/preschools. Only one school study assessed the impact of involving parents systematically. The family-based programs which provided simple positive dietary advice to parents and regular follow-up reduced fat intake significantly. School and family-based studies, if designed and implemented well, increased F&V intake, particularly fruit. Effective school-based programs have incorporated role-models including peers, teachers and heroic figures, rewards and increased access to healthy foods. School nutrition programs in disadvantaged communities were as effective as programs in other communities. Family and school nutrition programs can improve dietary intake, however evidence of the long-term sustainability of these impacts is limited. The modest overall impact of even these successful programs suggest complementary nutrition interventions are needed to build a supportive environment for healthy eating generally.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 229 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 229 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 39 17%
Student > Bachelor 34 15%
Researcher 23 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 8%
Student > Postgraduate 12 5%
Other 45 20%
Unknown 58 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 47 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 35 15%
Social Sciences 24 10%
Sports and Recreations 11 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 3%
Other 38 17%
Unknown 67 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2021.
All research outputs
#3,157,844
of 18,057,469 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,559
of 12,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,392
of 332,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#261
of 714 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,057,469 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,144 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 714 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.