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Finnish physicians’ stress related to information systems keeps increasing: a longitudinal three-wave survey study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, October 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Finnish physicians’ stress related to information systems keeps increasing: a longitudinal three-wave survey study
Published in
BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12911-017-0545-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tarja Heponiemi, Hannele Hyppönen, Tuulikki Vehko, Sari Kujala, Anna-Mari Aalto, Jukka Vänskä, Marko Elovainio

Abstract

Poorly functioning, time-consuming, and inadequate information systems are among the most important work-related psychosocial factors causing stress in physicians. The present study examined the trend in the perceived stress that was related to information systems (SRIS) among Finnish physicians during a nine-year follow-up. In addition, we examined the associations of gender, age, employment sector, specialization status, leadership position, on-call burden, and time pressure with SRIS change and levels. A longitudinal design with three survey data collection waves (2006, 2010 and 2015) based on a random sample of Finnish physicians in 2006 was used. The study sample included 1095 physicians (62.3% women, mean age 54.4 years) who provided data on SRIS in every wave. GLM repeated measures analyses were used to examine the associations between independent variables and the SRIS trend during the years 2006, 2010, and 2015. SRIS increased during the study period. The estimated marginal mean of SRIS in 2006 was 2.80 (95% CI = 2.68-2.92) and the mean increase was 0.46 (95% CI = 0.30-0.61) points from 2006 to 2010 and 0.25 (95% CI = 0.11-0.39) points from 2010 to 2015. Moreover, our results show that the increase was most pronounced in primary care, whereas in hospitals SRIS did not increase between 2010 and 2015. SRIS increased more among those in a leadership position. On-call duties and high time-pressures were associated with higher SRIS levels during all waves. Changing, difficult, and poorly functioning information systems (IS) are a prominent source of stress among Finnish physicians and this perceived stress continues to increase. Organizations should implement arrangements to ease stress stemming from IS especially for those with a high workload and on-call or leadership duties. To decrease IS-related stress, it would be important to study in more detail the main IS factors that contribute to SRIS. Earlier studies indicate that the usability and stability of information systems as well as end-user involvement in system development and work-procedure planning may be significant factors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 25%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Other 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 25%
Psychology 9 18%
Social Sciences 4 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 6%
Computer Science 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#6,494,863
of 12,019,430 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
#559
of 1,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,817
of 284,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
#21
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,019,430 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,075 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,354 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.