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Oligonucleotide treatment causes flax β-glucanase up-regulation via changes in gene-body methylation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, October 2014
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3 tweeters

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14 Dimensions

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Oligonucleotide treatment causes flax β-glucanase up-regulation via changes in gene-body methylation
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12870-014-0261-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wioleta Wojtasik, Anna Kulma, Aleksandra Boba, Jan Szopa

Abstract

BackgroundNowadays, the challenge for biotechnology is to develop tools for agriculture and industry to provide plants characterized by productivity and quality that will satisfy the growing demand for different kinds of natural products. To meet the challenge, the generation and application of genetically modified plants is justified. However, the strong social resistance to genetically modified organisms and restrictive regulations in European Union countries necessitated the development of a new technology for new plant types generation which uses the knowledge resulting from analysis of genetically modified plants to generate favourably altered plants while omitting the introduction of heterologous genes to their genome. Four-year experiments led to the development of a technology inducing heritable epigenetic gene activation without transgenesis.ResultsThe method comprises the induction of changes in methylation/demethylation of the endogenous gene by the plant¿s treatment with short oligodeoxynucleotides antisense to the coding region. In vitro cultured plants and F3 generation flax plants overproducing the ß-1,3-glucanase gene (EMO-ßGlu flax) were characterized by up-regulation of ß-glucanase and chitinase genes, decreases in the methylation of CCGG sequences in the ß-glucanase gene and in total DNA methylation and, more importantly, reasonable resistance against Fusarium infection. In addition, EMO-ßGlu flax obtained by this technology showed similar features as those obtained by genetic engineering.ConclusionTo our best knowledge, this is the first report on plant gene activation by treatment with oligodeoxynucleotides homologous to the coding region of the gene. Apart from the evident effectiveness, the most important issue is that the EMO method allows generation of favourably altered plants, whose cultivation makes the plant producer independent from the complicated procedure of obtaining an agreement on GMO release into the environment and whose products might be more easily introduced to the global market.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Poland 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 25%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 6 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 39%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 28%
Unspecified 2 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2015.
All research outputs
#9,535,606
of 12,410,450 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#917
of 1,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,277
of 215,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#7
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,410,450 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,566 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.