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Rapid in situ 13C tracing of sucrose utilization in Arabidopsis sink and source leaves

Overview of attention for article published in Plant Methods, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Rapid in situ 13C tracing of sucrose utilization in Arabidopsis sink and source leaves
Published in
Plant Methods, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13007-017-0239-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frederik Dethloff, Isabel Orf, Joachim Kopka

Abstract

Conventional metabolomics approaches face the problem of hidden metabolic phenotypes where only fluxes are altered but pool sizes stay constant. Metabolic flux experiments are used to detect such hidden flux phenotypes. These experiments are, however, time consuming, may be cost intensive, and involve specialists for modeling. We fill the gap between conventional metabolomics and flux modeling. We present rapid stable isotope tracing assays and analysis strategies of (13)C labeling data. For this purpose, we combine the conventional metabolomics approach that detects significant relative changes of metabolite pool sizes with analyses of differential utilization of (13)C labeled carbon. As a test case, we use uniformly labeled (13)C-sucrose. We present petiole and hypocotyl feeding assays for the rapid in situ feeding (≤ 4 h) of isotopically labeled metabolic precursor to whole Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes. The assays are assessed by conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolite profiling that was extended by joined differential analysis of (13)C-labeled sub-pools and of (13)C enrichment of metabolites relative to the enrichment of (13)C-sucrose within each sample. We apply these analyses to the sink to source transition continuum of leaves from single A. thaliana rosettes and characterize the associated relative changes of metabolite pools, as well as previously hidden changes of sucrose-derived carbon partitioning. We compared the contribution of sucrose as a carbon source in predominantly sink to predominantly source leaves and identified a set of primary metabolites with differential carbon utilization during sink to source transition. The presented feeding assays and data evaluation strategies represent a rapid and easy-to-use tool box for enhanced metabolomics studies that combine differential pool size analysis with screening for differential carbon utilization from defined stable isotope labeled metabolic precursors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 26%
Researcher 9 24%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 24%
Engineering 3 8%
Chemistry 3 8%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2018.
All research outputs
#4,097,766
of 13,845,249 outputs
Outputs from Plant Methods
#238
of 611 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,588
of 317,753 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Plant Methods
#29
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,845,249 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 611 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,753 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.