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Mutual maintenance of di- and triploid Pelophylax esculentus hybrids in R-E systems: results from artificial crossings experiments

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2017
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Title
Mutual maintenance of di- and triploid Pelophylax esculentus hybrids in R-E systems: results from artificial crossings experiments
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1063-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dmitry Dedukh, Spartak Litvinchuk, Juriy Rosanov, Dmitry Shabanov, Alla Krasikova

Abstract

Interspecies animal hybrids can employ clonal or hemiclonal reproduction modes where one or all parental genomes are transmitted to the progeny without recombination. Nevertheless, some interspecies hybrids retain strong connection with the parental species needed for successful reproduction. Appearance of polyploid hybrid animals may play an important role in the substitution of parental species and in the speciation process. To establish the mechanisms that enable parental species, diploid and polyploid hybrids coexist we have performed artificial crossing experiments of water frogs of Pelophylax esculentus complex. We identified tadpole karyotypes and oocyte genome composition in all females involved in the crossings. The majority of diploid and triploid hybrid frogs produced oocytes with 13 bivalents leading to haploid gametes with the same genome as parental species hybrids usually coexist with. After fertilization of such gametes only diploid animals appeared. Oocytes with 26 bivalents produced by some diploid hybrid frogs lead to diploid gametes, which give rise to triploid hybrids after fertilization. In gonads of all diploid and triploid hybrid tadpoles we found DAPI-positive micronuclei (nucleus-like bodies) involved in selective genome elimination. Hybrid male and female individuals produced tadpoles with variable karyotype and ploidy even in one crossing owing to gametes with various genome composition. We propose a model of diploid and triploid hybrid frog reproduction in R-E population systems. Triploid Pelophylax esculentus hybrids can transmit genome of parental species they coexist with by producing haploid gametes with the same genome composition. Triploid hybrids cannot produce triploid individuals after crossings with each other and depend on diploid hybrid females producing diploid eggs. In contrast to other population systems, the majority of diploid and triploid hybrid females unexpectedly produced gametes with the same genome as parental species hybrids coexist with.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 30%
Researcher 2 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 20%
Student > Master 1 10%
Lecturer 1 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 40%
Environmental Science 1 10%
Unknown 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,656,830
of 12,016,495 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,128
of 2,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#238,236
of 283,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#72
of 81 outputs
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