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Prevalence of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in symptomatic newborns under 3 weeks in Tehran, Iran

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
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Title
Prevalence of congenital cytomegalovirus infection in symptomatic newborns under 3 weeks in Tehran, Iran
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2799-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mina Ebrahimi-Rad, Talayeh Seyed Shakeri, Fariba Shirvani, Kiana Shahrokhi, Nader Shahrokhi

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common cause of congenital infection worldwide and infants with symptomatic congenital CMV (cCMV) infection are at significantly increased risk of developing adverse long-term outcomes. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cCMV infections in symptomatic infants under 3 weeks in Tehran, IRAN and to evaluate the usefulness of serologic markers in these neonates. Urine and serum samples of 100 symptomatic infants, under 3 weeks old, with clinical signs referred to Tehran medical centers from June 2013 to December 2014, were collected and tested for CMV-DNA and IgG/IgM antibody titers by PCR and ELISA, respectively. CMV-DNA was detected in urine of 58 cases, whereas only 20 cases had detectable CMV-IgM titers. All CMV-IgM positive cases excreted CMV-DNA through their urine. Of the 100 patients, only 59 had CMV-IgG antibody and CMV-DNA was found in the urine of only 40 of them. We conclude that CMV is an important etiologic agent of congenital infections in symptomatic infants in Tehran, IRAN (prevalence: 58%) and CMV-DNA detection immediately after delivery is recommended for early treatment and reduction of post infection problems. Furthermore, our study showed that the serologic markers are unreliable for diagnosis of cCMV infection in infants. This is the first report of cCMV prevalence in symptomatic congenital infections in Iran showing similarity with the world averages.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 9%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 12 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 9%
Computer Science 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 13 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2017.
All research outputs
#12,644,387
of 15,922,255 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,139
of 5,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#238,688
of 323,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#455
of 666 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,535 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 666 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.