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Factors associated with population coverage of targeted malaria elimination (TME) in southern Savannakhet Province, Lao PDR

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
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Title
Factors associated with population coverage of targeted malaria elimination (TME) in southern Savannakhet Province, Lao PDR
Published in
Malaria Journal, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2070-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bipin Adhikari, Koukeo Phommasone, Tiengkham Pongvongsa, Palingnaphone Kommarasy, Xayaphone Soundala, Gisela Henriques, Nicholas J. White, Nicholas P. J. Day, Arjen M. Dondorp, Lorenz von Seidlein, Phaik Yeong Cheah, Christopher Pell, Mayfong Mayxay

Abstract

Targeted malaria elimination (TME) in Lao PDR (Laos) included three rounds of mass drug administrations (MDA) against malaria followed by quarterly blood surveys in two villages in Nong District at Savannakhet Province. The success of MDA largely depends upon the efficacy of the anti-malarial drug regimen, local malaria epidemiology and the population coverage. In order to explore the reasons for participation in TME, a quantitative survey was conducted after the completion of the three rounds of MDA. The survey was conducted in two villages with a total of 158 households in July and August 2016. Among the 973 villagers eligible for participation in the MDA, 158 (16.2%) adults (> 18 years) were selected, one each from every household for the interviews using a quantitative questionnaire. 150/158 (94.9%) respondents participated at least in one activity (taking medicine or testing their blood) of TME. 141/150 (94.0%) respondents took part in the MDA and tested their blood in all three rounds. 17/158 (10.7%) were partial or non-participants in three rounds of MDA. Characteristics of respondents which were independently associated with completion of three rounds of MDA included: attending TME meetings [AOR = 12.0 (95% CI 1.1-20.5) (p = 0.03)], knowing that malaria can be diagnosed through blood tests [AOR = 5.6 (95% CI 1.0-32.3) (p = 0.05)], all members from household participated [AOR = 4.2 (95% CI 1.3-14.0) (p = 0.02)], liking all aspects of TME [AOR = 17.2 (95% CI 1.6-177.9) (p = 0.02)] and the perception that TME was important [AOR = 14.9 (95% CI 1.3-171.2) (p = 0.03)]. Complete participation in TME was significantly associated with participation in community engagement activities, knowledge that the blood tests were for malaria diagnosis, family members' participation at TME and perceptions that TME was worthwhile. A responsive approach to community engagement that includes formative research and the involvement of community members may increase the uptake of the intervention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 23%
Student > Master 6 10%
Lecturer 5 8%
Other 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 19 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 23%
Social Sciences 7 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 21 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2018.
All research outputs
#2,890,622
of 23,006,268 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#671
of 5,598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,455
of 327,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#16
of 129 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,006,268 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,598 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 327,882 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 129 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.