↓ Skip to main content

Iron regulatory protein (IRP)-iron responsive element (IRE) signaling pathway in human neurodegenerative diseases

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
143 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Iron regulatory protein (IRP)-iron responsive element (IRE) signaling pathway in human neurodegenerative diseases
Published in
Molecular Neurodegeneration, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13024-017-0218-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhi Dong Zhou, Eng-King Tan

Abstract

The homeostasis of iron is vital to human health, and iron dyshomeostasis can lead to various disorders. Iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and the iron-responsive element (IRE) signaling pathway. IRPs can bind to RNA stem-loops containing an IRE in the untranslated region (UTR) to manipulate translation of target mRNA. However, iron can bind to IRPs, leading to the dissociation of IRPs from the IRE and altered translation of target transcripts. Recently an IRE is found in the 5'-UTR of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and α-synuclein (α-Syn) transcripts. The levels of α-Syn, APP and amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) as well as protein aggregation can be down-regulated by IRPs but are up-regulated in the presence of iron accumulation. Therefore, inhibition of the IRE-modulated expression of APP and α-Syn or chelation of iron in patient's brains has therapeutic significance to human neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, new pre-drug IRE inhibitors with therapeutic effects have been identified and are at different stages of clinical trials for human neurodegenerative diseases. Although some promising drug candidates of chemical IRE inhibitors and iron-chelating agents have been identified and are being validated in clinical trials for neurodegenerative diseases, future studies are expected to further establish the clinical efficacy and safety of IRE inhibitors and iron-chelating agents in patients with neurodegenerative diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 143 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 143 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 31 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 21%
Student > Master 16 11%
Researcher 14 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 17 12%
Unknown 26 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 42 29%
Neuroscience 15 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 8%
Chemistry 11 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 6%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 33 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,528,075
of 12,043,827 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#395
of 527 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,518
of 284,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#20
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,043,827 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 527 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,901 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.