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The mediating effects of childhood neglect on the association between schizotypal and autistic personality traits and depression in a non-clinical sample

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, October 2017
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Title
The mediating effects of childhood neglect on the association between schizotypal and autistic personality traits and depression in a non-clinical sample
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12888-017-1510-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jianbo Liu, Jingbo Gong, Guanghui Nie, Yuqiong He, Bo Xiao, Yanmei Shen, Xuerong Luo

Abstract

Autistic personality traits (APT) and schizotypal personality traits (SPT) are associated with depression. However, mediating factors within these relationships have not yet been explored. Thus, the focus of the current study was to examine the effects of childhood neglect on the relationship between APT/SPT and depression. This cross-sectional study was conducted on first-year students (N = 2469) at Hunan University of Chinese Medicine and Hengyang Normal College (Changsha, China). Participants completed surveys on APT, SPT, childhood neglect, abuse and depression. Through correlational analyses, APT and SPT traits were positively correlated with childhood neglect and depression (p < 0.05). In a hierarchical regression analysis, among types of childhood maltreatment, emotional neglect (β = 0.112, p < 0.001) and physical neglect (β = 0.105, p < 0.001) were the strongest predictors of depression. Childhood neglect did not account for the relationships between APT/SPT and depression. Further analysis found that childhood neglect mediated the relationship between SPT and depression but not APT and depression. Among types of childhood maltreatment, neglect was the strongest predicting factor for depression. Neglect did not account for the relationship between APT/SPT and depression but was a strong mediating factor between SPT and depression.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 25%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Unspecified 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 19 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Neuroscience 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 22 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2017.
All research outputs
#12,843,182
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#3,035
of 3,401 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#271,220
of 318,821 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#361
of 405 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 405 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.