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Public health surveillance in the UK revolutionises our understanding of the invasive Salmonella Typhimurium epidemic in Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
twitter
57 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
112 Mendeley
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Title
Public health surveillance in the UK revolutionises our understanding of the invasive Salmonella Typhimurium epidemic in Africa
Published in
Genome Medicine, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13073-017-0480-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Philip M. Ashton, Siân V. Owen, Lukeki Kaindama, Will P. M. Rowe, Chris R. Lane, Lesley Larkin, Satheesh Nair, Claire Jenkins, Elizabeth M. de Pinna, Nicholas A. Feasey, Jay C. D. Hinton, Timothy J. Dallman

Abstract

The ST313 sequence type of Salmonella Typhimurium causes invasive non-typhoidal salmonellosis and was thought to be confined to sub-Saharan Africa. Two distinct phylogenetic lineages of African ST313 have been identified. We analysed the whole genome sequences of S. Typhimurium isolates from UK patients that were generated following the introduction of routine whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of Salmonella enterica by Public Health England in 2014. We found that 2.7% (84/3147) of S. Typhimurium from patients in England and Wales were ST313 and were associated with gastrointestinal infection. Phylogenetic analysis revealed novel diversity of ST313 that distinguished UK-linked gastrointestinal isolates from African-associated extra-intestinal isolates. The majority of genome degradation of African ST313 lineage 2 was conserved in the UK-ST313, but the African lineages carried a characteristic prophage and antibiotic resistance gene repertoire. These findings suggest that a strong selection pressure exists for certain horizontally acquired genetic elements in the African setting. One UK-isolated lineage 2 strain that probably originated in Kenya carried a chromosomally located bla CTX-M-15, demonstrating the continual evolution of this sequence type in Africa in response to widespread antibiotic usage. The discovery of ST313 isolates responsible for gastroenteritis in the UK reveals new diversity in this important sequence type. This study highlights the power of routine WGS by public health agencies to make epidemiologically significant deductions that would be missed by conventional microbiological methods. We speculate that the niche specialisation of sub-Saharan African ST313 lineages is driven in part by the acquisition of accessory genome elements.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 112 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 15%
Student > Master 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 4%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 35 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 13 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 4%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 36 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 82. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2020.
All research outputs
#381,258
of 21,005,902 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#68
of 1,343 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,928
of 339,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#9
of 100 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,005,902 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,343 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,982 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 100 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.