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Feasibility and effectiveness of drop-off spots to promote walking to school

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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89 Mendeley
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Title
Feasibility and effectiveness of drop-off spots to promote walking to school
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0136-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Griet Vanwolleghem, Sara D’Haese, Delfien Van Dyck, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Greet Cardon

Abstract

BackgroundDrop-off spots are locations in the proximity of primary schools where parents can drop off or pick up their child. From these drop-off spots children can walk to and from school. This pilot study aimed to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of drop-off spots and to evaluate how drop-off spots are perceived by school principals, teachers and parents of 6-to-12-year old children.MethodsFirst, a feasibility questionnaire was completed (n¿=¿216) to obtain parental opinions towards the implementation of drop-off spots. A drop-off spot was organized (500¿800 m distance from school) in two primary schools. A within-subject design was used to compare children¿s (n¿=¿58) step counts and number of walking trips during usual conditions (baseline) and during implementation of a drop-off spot (intervention). Three-level (class-participant-condition) linear regression models were used to determine intervention effects. After the intervention, 2 school principals, 7 teachers and 44 parents filled out a process evaluation questionnaire.ResultsPrior to the intervention, 96% expressed the need for adult supervision during the route to school. Positive significant intervention effects were found for step counts before/after school hours (+732 step counts/day; X2¿=¿12.2; p¿<¿0.001) and number of walking trips to/from school (+2 trips/week; X2¿=¿52.9; p¿<¿0.001). No intervention effect was found for total step counts/day (X2¿=¿2.0; p¿=¿0.16). The intervention was positively perceived by the school principals and parents, but teachers expressed doubts regarding future implementation.ConclusionThis pilot study showed that implementing drop-off spots might be an effective intervention to promote children¿s walking to school. Implementing drop-off spots does not require major efforts from the schools and schools can choose how and when they organize drop-off spots. However, motivating teachers and involving other volunteers (e.g. parents, grandparents) may be needed. Future studies should investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of drop-off spots in a larger sample of schools.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 89 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 17%
Student > Master 15 17%
Student > Bachelor 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 13 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 15 17%
Sports and Recreations 14 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 9%
Psychology 7 8%
Other 16 18%
Unknown 21 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2016.
All research outputs
#1,536,389
of 21,680,385 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#615
of 1,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,114
of 252,547 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#28
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,680,385 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,859 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,547 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.