↓ Skip to main content

The impact of N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid in contrast-induced nephropathy in critical care patients: an open-label randomized controlled study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
65 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
91 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The impact of N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid in contrast-induced nephropathy in critical care patients: an open-label randomized controlled study
Published in
Critical Care, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13054-017-1862-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eleni Palli, Demosthenes Makris, John Papanikolaou, Grigorios Garoufalis, Irini Tsilioni, Paris Zygoulis, Epaminondas Zakynthinos

Abstract

The aim was to investigate whether the use of N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid reduce contrast-induced nephropathy incidence in critical care patients. This was a one-center, two-arm, prospective, randomized, open-label, controlled trial in the Intensive Care Unit of the University Hospital of Larissa, Greece. Patients with stable renal function, who underwent non urgent contrast-enhanced computed tomography for diagnostic purposes, were included in the study. Patients in the treatment group (NacA, n = 60) received intravenously N-acetylcysteine (1200 mg) and ascorbic acid (2 g) dissolved separately in 100 ml of normal saline 2 hours before, and at 10 hours and 18 hours following the infusion of contrast agent, while control group patients (CG, n = 64) received only normal saline. All patients received additional hydration. Contrast-induced nephropathy was defined as relative increase by 25% of the baseline values of serum creatinine. Contrast-induced nephropathy in NacA and CG were 18.33% and 15.6%, respectively (p = 0.81). The percentage change median (interquartile range (IR)) of serum cystatin-C (mg/L) from baseline in patients who underwent contrast-induced tomography, were 37.23% (28.53) and 93.20% (46.90) in NacA and in CG, respectively (p = 0.03). The 8-isoprostane serum levels in NacA were significantly lower compared to CG at 2 hours (p = 0.012) and 24 hours (p = 0.006) following radiocontrast infusion. Multivariate analysis revealed that contrast-induced nephropathy was independently associated with a higher baseline ratio of serum urea/creatinine (odds ratio, 1.02; 95 CI%, 1.00-1.05) and with the use of nephrotoxic medications (odds ratio, 0.24; 95 CI%, 0.06-0.94). Intravenous administration of N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid failed to reduce contrast-induced nephropathy in critically ill patients who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography, despite a significant reduction of 8-isoprostane levels in treated patients. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01017796 . Registered on 20 November 2009.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 65 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 91 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 15%
Other 10 11%
Researcher 9 10%
Student > Master 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Other 21 23%
Unknown 20 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 46%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 3%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 24 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2018.
All research outputs
#947,089
of 23,007,053 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#776
of 6,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,738
of 328,927 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#14
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,007,053 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,090 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 328,927 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.