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Probiotics and virulent human rotavirus modulate the transplanted human gut microbiota in gnotobiotic pigs

Overview of attention for article published in Gut Pathogens, September 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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57 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Probiotics and virulent human rotavirus modulate the transplanted human gut microbiota in gnotobiotic pigs
Published in
Gut Pathogens, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13099-014-0039-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Husen Zhang, Haifeng Wang, Megan Shepherd, Ke Wen, Guohua Li, Xingdong Yang, Jacob Kocher, Ernawati Giri-Rachman, Allan Dickerman, Robert Settlage, Lijuan Yuan

Abstract

We generated a neonatal pig model with human infant gut microbiota (HGM) to study the effect of a probiotic on the composition of the transplanted microbiota following rotavirus vaccination and challenge. All the HGM-transplanted pigs received two doses of an oral attenuated rotavirus vaccine. The gut microbiota of vaccinated pigs were investigated for effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplement and homotypic virulent human rotavirus (HRV) challenge. High-throughput sequencing of V4 region of 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that HGM-transplanted pigs carried microbiota similar to that of the C-section delivered baby. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria represented over 98% of total bacteria in the human donor and the recipient pigs. HRV challenge caused a phylum-level shift from Firmicutes to Proteobacteria. LGG supplement prevented the changes in microbial communities caused by HRV challenge. In particular, members of Enterococcus in LGG-supplemented pigs were kept at the baseline level, while they were enriched in HRV challenged pigs. Taken together, our results suggested that HGM pigs are valuable for testing the microbiota's response to probiotic interventions for treating infantile HRV infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 24%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 13%
Researcher 6 11%
Other 5 9%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 9%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 7 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2014.
All research outputs
#13,290,426
of 21,321,610 outputs
Outputs from Gut Pathogens
#204
of 492 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,676
of 252,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gut Pathogens
#5
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 492 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,164 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.