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Management of bronchial secretions with Free Aspire in children with cerebral palsy: impact on clinical outcomes and healthcare resources

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, January 2016
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Title
Management of bronchial secretions with Free Aspire in children with cerebral palsy: impact on clinical outcomes and healthcare resources
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13052-016-0216-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giancarlo Garuti, Elisa Verucchi, Isabella Fanelli, Michele Giovannini, Joao Carlos Winck, Mirco Lusuardi

Abstract

Management of secretions in children with cerebral palsy is often problematic due to severe deformation of the rib cage, impaired cough, and patients'inability to collaborate with chest physiotherapy. Assessing the effectiveness of different methods and techniques of secretion clearance is hampered by the lack of direct outcome measures and by limited patient cooperation. This observational study was planned to evaluate the efficacy of Free Aspire, a device that utilizes a special method to remove secretions from the bronchial tree in hypersecretive patients. Cerebral palsy patients were selected who had experienced more than 3 episodes of respiratory exacerbations in the latest year despite therapeutic optimization (including bronchial clearance techniques) and who had received at least one antibiotic course or underwent at least one access to the Emergency Room (ER) or admission to hospital in the 6 months prior to the study. Patients with congestive heart failure or contraindications for Free Aspire were excluded. We prospectively enrolled 8 patients (mean age 8.25 ± 6.11 years) who had been using in the past techniques for clearance secretions different from Free Aspire. The treatment with Free Aspire consisted of at least two 20-min sessions per day. The observational study period was 18 months. In the 6 months prior to start the treatment (T0), patients had a mean number of 4.0 ± 2.23 visits from the primary care pediatrician (PCP), spent 14 ± 20 days in hospital, and received antibiotics for 35 ± 17 days. After the first 6 months of treatment (T1), they had 1.7 ± 0.73 PCP visits, no days spent in hospital, and 9.75 ± 10.4 days of antibiotic therapy. At 12 months of treatment (T2), PCP visits were 1.7 ± 0.70, days in hospital 1.12 ± 0.3, and days of antibiotics 10.25 ± 10. At 18 months of treatment (T3) no hospitalizations had occurred, PCP visits were 0.25 ± 0.70, and days of antibiotic therapy 4.8 ± 12.62. The technique proved to be safe and well tolerated. Our findings show that Free Aspire for bronchial secretion clearance in cerebral palsy patients with limited capacity to collaborate is safe and effective in reducing the impact of respiratory exacerbations in terms of number of PCP visits, days spent in hospital, and days of antibiotic therapy; its regular use maintains this effect in time.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 62 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 17%
Other 10 16%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 14 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 29%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 5%
Psychology 2 3%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 16 25%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 October 2017.
All research outputs
#20,451,228
of 23,007,053 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#774
of 954 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#332,835
of 395,782 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#20
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,007,053 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 954 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 395,782 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.