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Social, economic, and health impact of the respiratory syncytial virus: a systematic search

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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55 Dimensions

Readers on

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164 Mendeley
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Title
Social, economic, and health impact of the respiratory syncytial virus: a systematic search
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0544-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Javier Díez-Domingo, Eduardo G Pérez-Yarza, José A Melero, Manuel Sánchez-Luna, María Dolores Aguilar, Antonio Javier Blasco, Noelia Alfaro, Pablo Lázaro

Abstract

BackgroundBronchiolitis caused by the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and its related complications are common in infants born prematurely, with severe congenital heart disease, or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, as well as in immunosuppressed infants. There is a rich literature on the different aspects of RSV infection with a focus, for the most part, on specific risk populations. However, there is a need for a systematic global analysis of the impact of RSV infection in terms of use of resources and health impact on both children and adults. With this aim, we performed a systematic search of scientific evidence on the social, economic, and health impact of RSV infection.MethodsA systematic search of the following databases was performed: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Spanish Medical Index, MEDES-MEDicina in Spanish, Cochrane Plus Library, and Google without time limits. We selected 421 abstracts based on the 6,598 articles identified. From these abstracts, 4 RSV experts selected the most relevant articles. They selected 65 articles. After reading the full articles, 23 of their references were also selected. Finally, one more article found through a literature information alert system was included.ResultsThe information collected was summarized and organized into the following topics: 1. Impact on health (infections and respiratory complications, mid- to long-term lung function decline, recurrent wheezing, asthma, other complications such as otitis and rhino-conjunctivitis, and mortality; 2. Impact on resources (visits to primary care and specialists offices, emergency room visits, hospital admissions, ICU admissions, diagnostic tests, and treatments); 3. Impact on costs (direct and indirect costs); 4. Impact on quality of life; and 5. Strategies to reduce the impact (interventions on social and hygienic factors and prophylactic treatments).ConclusionsWe concluded that 1. The health impact of RSV infection is relevant and goes beyond the acute episode phase; 2. The health impact of RSV infection on children is much better documented than the impact on adults; 3. Further research is needed on mid- and long-term impact of RSV infection on the adult population, especially those at high-risk; 4. There is a need for interventions aimed at reducing the impact of RSV infection by targeting health education, information, and prophylaxis in high-risk populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 164 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 33 20%
Student > Master 32 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 11%
Student > Bachelor 17 10%
Other 16 10%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 27 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 60 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 6%
Social Sciences 7 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 4%
Other 32 20%
Unknown 36 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,611,636
of 6,380,459 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,310
of 2,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,505
of 156,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#90
of 193 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,380,459 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,967 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 156,303 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 193 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.