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Physical developmental cues for the maturation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, October 2014
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
patent
1 patent

Citations

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85 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
179 Mendeley
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Title
Physical developmental cues for the maturation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, October 2014
DOI 10.1186/scrt507
Pubmed ID
Authors

Renjun Zhu, Adriana Blazeski, Ellen Poon, Kevin D Costa, Leslie Tung, Kenneth R Boheler

Abstract

Human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs) are the most promising source of cardiomyocytes (CMs) for experimental and clinical applications, but their use is largely limited by a structurally and functionally immature phenotype that most closely resembles embryonic or fetal heart cells. The application of physical stimuli to influence hPSC-CMs through mechanical and bioelectrical transduction offers a powerful strategy for promoting more developmentally mature CMs. Here we summarize the major events associated with in vivo heart maturation and structural development. We then review the developmental state of in vitro derived hPSC-CMs, while focusing on physical (electrical and mechanical) stimuli and contributory (metabolic and hypertrophic) factors that are actively involved in structural and functional adaptations of hPSC-CMs. Finally, we highlight areas for possible future investigation that should provide a better understanding of how physical stimuli may promote in vitro development and lead to mechanistic insights. Advances in the use of physical stimuli to promote developmental maturation will be required to overcome current limitations and significantly advance research of hPSC-CMs for cardiac disease modeling, in vitro drug screening, cardiotoxicity analysis and therapeutic applications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 179 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Unknown 176 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 24%
Researcher 32 18%
Student > Master 31 17%
Student > Bachelor 18 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 8%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 22 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 30%
Engineering 27 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 4%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 26 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2019.
All research outputs
#4,580,876
of 15,606,212 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#421
of 1,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,446
of 234,333 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#9
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,212 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,333 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.