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A functional movement screen profile of an Australian state police force: a retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, July 2016
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2 tweeters

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61 Mendeley
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Title
A functional movement screen profile of an Australian state police force: a retrospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12891-016-1146-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin Marc Orr, Rodney Pope, Michael Stierli, Ben Hinton

Abstract

Police officers are required to perform dynamic movements in unpredictable environments, the results of which can lead to injury. Early identification of poor movement patterns of a police population, and potential sub groups within this population, may provide opportunities to treat and minimise injury risks. The aim of this study was to profile the functional movement capabilities of an Australian state police force and potential sub groups through a retrospective cohort study. Retrospective data from an Australian State Police Force were provided for analysis (♂ n = 1155, mean (±SD) age = 31.34 ± 8.41 years: ♀ n = 357, mean age = 27.99 ± 8.02 years). Data consisted of Functional Movement Screen (FMS) assessment results of male and female trainees and qualified police officers with all assessments conducted by a qualified Police Physical Training Instructor. Significantly higher (U = 253863, p < .001) FMS total scores were found for recruits (mean 15.23 ± SD 2.01 points) when compared to attested officers (14.57 ± 2.96 points) and differences in FMS total scores also approached significance for females (15.24 ± 2.35 points) when compared to males (14.84 ± 2.55 points, U = 186926, p = .007), with age found to be a key, significant factor in explaining these observed differences (F (1,1507) = 23.519, p < .001). The FMS components demonstrating poorest movement performance across all groups were the hurdle step and rotary stability. Generally, police personnel (both attested officers and recruits of both genders) of greater age have a lower functional movement capability when compared to younger personnel, with greater percentages scoring 14 or below on the FMS. Specific conditioning programs to improve strength, range of motion and stability during identified key movement types in those demonstrating poorer movement performance may serve to reduce injuries in police personnel.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Researcher 6 10%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 18 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 17 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2019.
All research outputs
#8,969,774
of 15,298,914 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,562
of 2,981 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,517
of 321,596 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#169
of 305 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,298,914 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,981 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 321,596 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 305 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.