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Long-term in vitro culture of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Madagascar maintained in Saimiri boliviensis blood

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

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10 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term in vitro culture of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Madagascar maintained in Saimiri boliviensis blood
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2090-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rajeev K. Mehlotra, D’Arbra Blankenship, Rosalind E. Howes, Tovonahary A. Rakotomanga, Brune Ramiranirina, Stephanie Ramboarina, Thierry Franchard, Marlin H. Linger, Melinda Zikursh-Blood, Arsène C. Ratsimbasoa, Peter A. Zimmerman, Brian T. Grimberg

Abstract

Plasmodium vivax is the most prevalent human malaria parasite and is likely to increase proportionally as malaria control efforts more rapidly impact the prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum. Despite the prominence of P. vivax as a major human pathogen, vivax malaria qualifies as a neglected and under-studied tropical disease. Significant challenges bringing P. vivax into the laboratory, particularly the capacity for long-term propagation of well-characterized strains, have limited the study of this parasite's red blood cell (RBC) invasion mechanism, blood-stage development, gene expression, and genetic manipulation. Patient isolates of P. vivax have been collected and cryopreserved in the rural community of Ampasimpotsy, located in the Tsiroanomandidy Health District of Madagascar. Periodic, monthly overland transport of these cryopreserved isolates to the country's National Malaria Control Programme laboratory in Antananarivo preceded onward sample transfer to laboratories at Case Western Reserve University, USA. There, the P. vivax isolates have been cultured through propagation in the RBCs of Saimiri boliviensis. For the four patient isolates studied to-date, the median time interval between sample collection and in vitro culture has been 454 days (range 166-961 days). The median time in culture, continually documented by light microscopy, has been 159 days; isolate AMP2014.01 was continuously propagated for 233 days. Further studies show that the P. vivax parasites propagated in Saimiri RBCs retain their ability to invade human RBCs, and can be cryopreserved, thawed and successfully returned to productive in vitro culture. Long-term culture of P. vivax is possible in the RBCs of Saimiri boliviensis. These studies provide an alternative to propagation of P. vivax in live animals that are becoming more restricted. In vitro culture of P. vivax in Saimiri RBCs provides an opening to stabilize patient isolates, which would serve as precious resources to apply new strategies for investigating the molecular and cellular biology of this important malaria parasite.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Student > Master 8 14%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 18 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 June 2018.
All research outputs
#4,469,573
of 17,365,229 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,224
of 4,797 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,200
of 329,337 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#157
of 491 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,365,229 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,797 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,337 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 491 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.