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Reported dietary intake in early pregnant compared to non-pregnant women – a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2014
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1 tweeter

Citations

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30 Dimensions

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112 Mendeley
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Title
Reported dietary intake in early pregnant compared to non-pregnant women – a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12884-014-0373-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anette Lundqvist, Ingegerd Johansson, AnnaLena Wennberg, Johan Hultdin, Ulf Högberg, Katarina Hamberg, Herbert Sandström

Abstract

BackgroundA woman¿s nutritional status before conception and during pregnancy is important for maternal health and the health of the foetus. The aim of the study was to compare diet intake in early pregnant women with non-pregnant women.MethodsBetween September 2006 and March 2009, 226 women in early pregnancy were consecutively recruited at five antenatal clinics in Northern Sweden. Referent women (n¿=¿211) were randomly selected from a current health screening project running in the same region (the Västerbotten Intervention Program; VIP). We collected diet data with a self-reported validated food frequency questionnaire with 66 food items/food aggregates, and information on portion size, alcohol consumption, and supplement intake. Data were analysed using descriptive, comparative statistics and multivariate partial least square modelling.ResultsIntake of folate and vitamin D from foods was generally low for both groups. Intake of folate and vitamin D supplements was generally high in the pregnant group and led to significantly higher total estimated intake of vitamin D and folate in the pregnant group. Iron intake from foods tended to be lower in pregnant women although iron supplement intake evened out the difference with respect to iron intake from foods only. Energy intake was slightly lower in pregnant women but not significant, a reflection of that they reported consuming significantly less of potatoes/rice/pasta, meat/fish, and vegetables (grams/day) than the women in the referent group.ConclusionsIn the present study, women in early pregnancy reported less intake of vegetables, potatoes, meat, and alcohol than non-pregnant women. As they also had a low intake (below the Nordic Nutritional Recommendations) of folate, vitamin D, and iron from foods, some of these women and their unborn children are possibly at risk for adverse effects on the pregnancy and birth outcome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Pakistan 1 <1%
Unknown 110 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 12%
Researcher 12 11%
Other 10 9%
Other 22 20%
Unknown 22 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 28 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 November 2014.
All research outputs
#14,312,519
of 21,321,610 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#2,797
of 3,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,291
of 253,589 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#306
of 383 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,851 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,589 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 383 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.