↓ Skip to main content

Application of veno-arterial-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in differential hypoxia

Overview of attention for article published in Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine, January 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Application of veno-arterial-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in differential hypoxia
Published in
Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/2049-6958-9-55
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joon Choi, Su Kim, Young Kim, Song-Yi Kim, Ki-Seok Kim, Seung-Jae Joo, Jung Lee

Abstract

Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) through the femoral vein and artery may cause differential hypoxia, i.e., lower PaO2 in the upper body than in the lower body, because of normal cardiac output with severe impairment of pulmonary function. Hereby, we report the diagnosis and the treatment of differential hypoxia caused by veno-arterial ECMO. A 39-year-old man received cardiopulmonary resuscitation from a cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction. Even after more than 30 min of resuscitation, spontaneous circulation had not resumed. Next, we performed veno-arterial ECMO through the femoral artery and vein, and the patient recovered consciousness on the second day of ECMO. On day 5 of ECMO, he lost consciousness again and presented a generalized tonic-clonic seizure, and an electroencephalogram showed delta waves suggesting diffuse cerebral cortical dysfunction. While an echocardiogram revealed improvements in myocardial function, a follow up chest radiograph showed increasing massive parenchymal infiltrations, and gas analysis of blood from the right radial artery revealed severe hypoxemia. These findings indicated a definite diagnosis of differential hypoxia, and therefore, we inserted a 17-Fr cannula into the left subclavian vein as a return cannula. The patient's consciousness and pulmonary infiltrations were improved 2 days after veno-arterial-venous ECMO, and the electroencephalogram showed normal findings. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful clinical management of differential hypoxia. We suggest that veno-arterial-venous ECMO could be the treatment of choice for differential hypoxia resulting from veno-arterial ECMO.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Other 5 11%
Student > Master 5 11%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 59%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2017.
All research outputs
#13,866,121
of 21,339,655 outputs
Outputs from Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine
#167
of 286 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,226
of 254,174 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine
#15
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,339,655 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 286 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,174 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.