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Hearing impairment and its risk factors by newborn screening in north-western India

Overview of attention for article published in Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, July 2015
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Title
Hearing impairment and its risk factors by newborn screening in north-western India
Published in
Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40748-015-0018-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zia Ul Haq Gouri, Deepak Sharma, Pramod Kumar Berwal, Aakash Pandita, Smita Pawar

Abstract

To screen the newborn by Transient evoked Otoacoustic emission and to assess the incidence of hearing damage and associated risk factors. This longitudinal prospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital in India. A total of 415 babies were included in the study. All the newborns were evaluated with Transient evoked Otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) which was done by age of 1-3 days. Auditory brain stem response audiometry (AABR) was performed at the age of three months for confirming the hearing loss in the neonates those who failed the TEOAE screening. For infants proven to have significant hearing loss in one or both ears, were denoted to an ear, nose, and throat specialist for further evaluation & rehabilitation. Out of total 415 babies included in the study, 22 neonates showed abnormal TEOAE examination. Out of these 22 neonates, hearing loss was confirmed in 18 (82 %) subjects. by AABR. The following antenatal and post-natal risk factors were associated with hearing loss: ante-partum bleeding, history of maternal blood transfusion, fetal distress, prematurity, severe birth asphyxia, NICU admission for more than 24 h and Apgar score less than five at 5 min. Late identification of hearing loss presents a substantial public health burden. Early recognition and intervention prior to 6 months of age has a significant positive impact on development. A high incidence of hearing impairment seen in our study neonatal population warrants the urgent implementation of universal hearing screening of all the newborn infants in India. NICU infants admitted for more than 24 h are to have an auditory brainstem response (AABR) included as part of their screening so that neural hearing loss will not be missed.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Postgraduate 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 17 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Psychology 3 5%
Decision Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 18 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2017.
All research outputs
#10,728,278
of 12,098,562 outputs
Outputs from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#36
of 41 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#239,025
of 285,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#10
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,098,562 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 41 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one scored the same or higher as 5 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.