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Medical students as health coaches: Implementation of a student-initiated Lifestyle Medicine curriculum

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 552)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

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48 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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91 Mendeley
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Title
Medical students as health coaches: Implementation of a student-initiated Lifestyle Medicine curriculum
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13584-017-0167-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rani Polak, Adi Finkelstein, Tom Axelrod, Marie Dacey, Matan Cohen, Dennis Muscato, Avi Shariv, Naama W Constantini, Mayer Brezis

Abstract

By 2020, the World Health Organization predicts that two-thirds of all diseases worldwide will be the result of lifestyle choices. Physicians often do not counsel patients about healthy behaviors, and lack of training has been identified as one of the barriers. Between 2010 and 2014, Hebrew University developed and implemented a 58-h Lifestyle Medicine curriculum spanning five of the 6 years of medical school. Content includes nutrition, exercise, smoking cessation, and behavior change, as well as health coaching practice with friends/relatives (preclinical years) and patients (clinical years). This report describes this development and diffusion process, and it also presents findings related to the level of acceptance of this student-initiated Lifestyle Medicine (LM) curriculum. Students completed an online semi-structured questionnaire after the first coaching session (coaching questionnaire) and the last coaching session (follow-up questionnaire). Nine hundred and twenty-three students completed the coaching questionnaire (296 practices were with patients, 627 with friends /relatives); and 784 students completed the follow-up questionnaire (208 practices were with patients, 576 with friends /relatives). They reported overall that health coaching domains included smoking cessation (263 students), nutrition (79), and exercise (117); 464 students reported on combined topics. Students consistently described a high acceptance of the curriculum and their active role in coaching. Further, most students reported that they were eager to address their own health behaviors. We described the development and acceptance of a student-initiated comprehensive LM curriculum. Students perceived LM as an important component of physicians' professional role and were ready to explore it both as coaches and in their personal lives. Thus, medical school deans might consider developing similar initiatives in order to position medical schools as key players within a preventive strategy in healthcare policy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 48 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 91 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Other 7 8%
Other 17 19%
Unknown 26 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 11%
Psychology 7 8%
Social Sciences 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 29 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 33. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2019.
All research outputs
#884,007
of 20,366,321 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#12
of 552 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,541
of 338,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#2
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,366,321 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 552 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,787 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.