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Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, January 2006
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Title
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, January 2006
DOI 10.1186/1476-511x-5-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jameela Banu, Arunabh Bhattacharya, Mizanur Rahman, Marianne O'Shea, Gabriel Fernandes

Abstract

There is an increase in obesity among the population of industrialized countries, and dietary supplementation with Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) has been reported to lower body fat mass. However, weight loss is generally associated with negative effects on bone mass, but CLA is reported to have beneficial effects on bone. Furthermore, another factor that is well established to have a beneficial effect on bone is exercise (EX). However, a combination therapy of CLA and EX on bone health has not been studied. In this paper, we report the beneficial effects of CLA and EX on bone, in four different groups of Balb-C young, male mice. There were 4 groups in our study: 1. Safflower oil (SFO) sedentary (SED); 2. SFO EX; 3. CLA SED; 4. CLA EX. Two months old mice, under their respective treatment regimens were followed for 14 weeks. Mice were scanned in vivo using a DEXA scanner before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were sacrificed, the left tibia was removed and scanned using peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT). The results showed that although CLA decreased gain in body weight by 35%, it however increased bone mass by both reducing bone resorption and increasing bone formation. EX also decreased gain in body weight by 21% and increased bone mass; but a combination of CLA and EX, however, did not show any further increase in bone mass. In conclusion, CLA increases bone mass in both cancellous and cortical bones, and the effects of CLA on bone is not further improved by EX in pure cortical bone of young male mice.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 17%
United States 1 4%
Unknown 18 78%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 26%
Sports and Recreations 4 17%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 9%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2014.
All research outputs
#12,272,456
of 15,446,226 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#728
of 1,119 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,903
of 235,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#36
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,446,226 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,119 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,079 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.