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Differences in immunoreactive trypsin values between type of feeding and ethnicity in neonatal cystic fibrosis screening: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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20 Mendeley
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Title
Differences in immunoreactive trypsin values between type of feeding and ethnicity in neonatal cystic fibrosis screening: a cross-sectional study
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13023-014-0166-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ernesto Cortés, Ana María Roldán, Antonio Palazón-Bru, María Mercedes Rizo-Baeza, Herminia Manero, Vicente Francisco Gil-Guillén

Abstract

BackgroundWe studied the differences in immunoreactive trypsin (IRT) in neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) associated individually with the age of the newborn, ethnicity and environmental temperature. In this study, we determine the overall influence of environmental temperature at birth, gender, feeding, gestational age, maternal age and ethnic origin on an abnormal IRT result.MethodsCross-sectional observational study. A sample was selected of newborns from Alicante (Spain) who underwent neonatal CF screening in 2012¿2013. Primary variable: abnormal IRT levels (¿65 ng/ml). Secondary variables: gender, maternal origin, maternal age (years) (<20, 20¿40, >40), gestational age (weeks) (<32, 32¿37, >37), type of feeding (natural, formula, mixed and special nutrition), >20 days from birth to blood collection, and average temperature during the month of birth (in°C). Using a multivariate logistic regression model the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated to analyze the association between atypical IRT levels and the study variables. The ¿ error was 5% and confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for the most relevant parameters.ResultsOf a total of 13,310 samples, 199 were abnormal (1.34%). Significant associated factors: feeding method (natural¿¿¿OR¿=¿1; mixed¿¿¿OR¿=¿0.53, 95% CI: 0.31-0.89; formula¿¿¿OR¿=¿0.72, 95% CI: 0.48-1.07; special¿¿¿OR¿=¿21.88, 95% CI: 6.92-69.14; p¿<¿0.001).ConclusionsNewborns receiving special nutrition have a 20-fold higher risk for abnormal IRT levels, and screening is advisable once normalized feeding is initiated. It is advisable to consider ethnic variability. Seasonality was not important.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 20%
Student > Master 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Other 4 20%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 15%
Psychology 2 10%
Mathematics 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 4 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2014.
All research outputs
#1,959,007
of 4,507,778 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#400
of 775 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,195
of 126,347 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#32
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,778 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 775 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,347 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.