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Rapid detection of dermatophytes and Candida albicansin onychomycosis specimens by an oligonucleotide array

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Rapid detection of dermatophytes and Candida albicansin onychomycosis specimens by an oligonucleotide array
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0581-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Huan Wen Han, Mark Ming-Long Hsu, Jong Soo Choi, Chao-Kai Hsu, Hsin Yi Hsieh, Hsin Chieh Li, Hsien Chang Chang, Tsung Chain Chang

Abstract

BackgroundOnychomycosis is a fungal infection of nails, leading to the gradual destruction of the nail plate. Treatment of onychomycosis may need long-time oral antifungal therapy that can have potential side effects, thus accurate diagnosis of the disease before treatment is important. Culture for diagnosis of onychomycosis is time-consuming and has high false-negative rates. To expedite the diagnosis, an oligonucleotide array, based on hybridization between immobilized oligonucleotide probes and PCR products, for direct detection of dermatophytes and Candida albicans in clinical specimens was evaluated.MethodsSpecies-specific oligonucleotide probes designed from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rRNA gene were immobilized on a nylon membrane. The assay procedures consisted of PCR amplification of the ITS using universal primers, followed by hybridization of the digoxigenin-labeled amplicons to probes on the array. Thirty two nail samples (29 patients) were analyzed by the array, and the results were compared with those obtained by culture. Array-positive but culture-negative samples were confirmed by cloning and re-sequencing of the amplified ITS and by reviewing patient¿s clinical data. The total recovery of culture and confirmed array-positive but culture-negative results was considered 100% and was used for performance evaluation of both methods.ResultsConcordant results were obtained in 21 samples (10 positives and 11 negatives) by both methods. Eleven samples were array-positive but culture-negative; among them, 9 samples were considered true positives after discrepant analysis. Comparing with culture, the array had significantly higher sensitivity [100% (95% CI 82.2% ¿100%) vs 52.6% (28.9% ¿75.5%), p <0.001] and negative predictive value [100% (71.3% ¿100%) vs 59.1% (36.4% ¿79.3%), p <0.05), while no significant differences were observed in specificity (84.6% vs 100%, p =0.48) and positive predictive value (90.5% vs 100%, p =1.0). The whole procedures of the array were about 24 h, whilst results from culture take 1 to 3 weeks.ConclusionsThe array offers an accurate and rapid alternative to culture. Rapid diagnosis can expedite appropriate antifungal treatment of onychomycosis. However, the single site nature of this study conducted at a referral hospital invites caution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Researcher 4 10%
Professor 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 6 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2015.
All research outputs
#14,203,791
of 22,769,322 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,769
of 7,668 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#136,494
of 262,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#81
of 197 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,769,322 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,668 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 197 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.