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Spreading and sustaining best practices for home care of older adults: a grounded theory study

Overview of attention for article published in Implementation Science, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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90 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Spreading and sustaining best practices for home care of older adults: a grounded theory study
Published in
Implementation Science, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13012-014-0162-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jenny Ploeg, Maureen Markle-Reid, Barbara Davies, Kathryn Higuchi, Wendy Gifford, Irmajean Bajnok, Heather McConnell, Jennifer Plenderleith, Sandra Foster, Sue Bookey-Bassett

Abstract

BackgroundImproving health care quality requires effective and timely spread of innovations that support evidence-based practices. However, there is limited rigorous research on the process of spread, factors influencing spread, and models of spread. It is particularly important to study spread within the home care sector given the aging of the population, expansion of home care services internationally, the high proportion of older adult users of home care services, and the vulnerability of this group who are frail and live with multiple chronic conditions. The purpose of this study was to understand how best practices related to older adults are spread within home care organizations.MethodsFour home care organizations in Ontario, Canada that had implemented best practices related to older adults (falls prevention, pain management, management of venous leg ulcers) participated. Using a qualitative grounded theory design, interviews were conducted with frontline providers, managers, and directors at baseline (n =44) and 1 year later (n =40). Open, axial, and selective coding and constant comparison analysis were used.ResultsA model of the process of spread of best practices within home care organizations was developed. The phases of spread included (1) committing to change, (2) implementing on a small scale, (3) adapting locally, (4) spreading internally to multiple users and sites, and (5) disseminating externally. Factors that facilitated progression through these phases were (1) leading with passion and commitment, (2) sustaining strategies, and (3) seeing the benefits. Project leads, champions, managers, and steering committees played vital roles in leading the spread process. Strategies such as educating/coaching and evaluating and feedback were key to sustaining the change. Spread occurred within the home care context of high staff and manager turnover and time and resource constraints.ConclusionsSpread of best practices is optimized through the application of the phases of spread, allocation of resources to support spread, and implementing strategies for ongoing sustainability that address potential barriers. Further research will help to understand how best practices are spread externally to other organizations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 89 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Researcher 13 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Other 19 21%
Unknown 7 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 22%
Social Sciences 18 20%
Psychology 5 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 6%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2015.
All research outputs
#3,271,662
of 14,288,069 outputs
Outputs from Implementation Science
#775
of 1,425 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,754
of 234,974 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Implementation Science
#52
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,288,069 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,425 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,974 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.