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Design of ProjectRun21: a 14-week prospective cohort study of the influence of running experience and running pace on running-related injury in half-marathoners

Overview of attention for article published in Injury Epidemiology, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Design of ProjectRun21: a 14-week prospective cohort study of the influence of running experience and running pace on running-related injury in half-marathoners
Published in
Injury Epidemiology, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40621-017-0124-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camma Damsted, Erik Thorlund Parner, Henrik Sørensen, Laurent Malisoux, Rasmus Oestergaard Nielsen

Abstract

Participation in half-marathon has been steeply increasing during the past decade. In line, a vast number of half-marathon running schedules has surfaced. Unfortunately, the injury incidence proportion for half-marathoners has been found to exceed 30% during 1-year follow-up. The majority of running-related injuries are suggested to develop as overuse injuries, which leads to injury if the cumulative training load over one or more training sessions exceeds the runners' load capacity for adaptive tissue repair. Owing to an increase of load capacity along with adaptive running training, the runners' running experience and pace abilities can be used as estimates for load capacity. Since no evidence-based knowledge exist of how to plan appropriate half-marathon running schedules considering the level of running experience and running pace, the aim of ProjectRun21 is to investigate the association between running experience or running pace and the risk of running-related injury. Healthy runners using Global Positioning System (GPS) watch between 18 and 65 years will be invited to participate in this 14-week prospective cohort study. Runners will be allowed to self-select one of three half-marathon running schedules developed for the study. Running data will be collected objectively by GPS. Injury will be based on the consensus-based time loss definition by Yamato et al.: "Running-related (training or competition) musculoskeletal pain in the lower limbs that causes a restriction on or stoppage of running (distance, speed, duration, or training) for at least 7 days or 3 consecutive scheduled training sessions, or that requires the runner to consult a physician or other health professional". Running experience and running pace will be included as primary exposures, while the exposure to running is pre-fixed in the running schedules and thereby conditioned by design. Time-to-event models will be used for analytical purposes. ProjectRun21 will examine if particular subgroups of runners with certain running experiences and running paces seem to sustain more running-related injuries compared with other subgroups of runners. This will enable sport coaches, physiotherapists as well as the runners to evaluate their injury risk of taking up a 14-week running schedule for half-marathon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 20%
Student > Bachelor 10 15%
Other 5 8%
Researcher 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 7 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 19 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 13 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2018.
All research outputs
#6,614,300
of 12,974,406 outputs
Outputs from Injury Epidemiology
#102
of 133 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,899
of 311,879 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Injury Epidemiology
#19
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,974,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.5. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,879 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.