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Physical activity and central adiposity in a cohort of African-American adults

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, November 2017
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Title
Physical activity and central adiposity in a cohort of African-American adults
Published in
BMC Obesity, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40608-017-0170-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sean McGrath, Danielle Brazel, Lara Dugas, Guichan Cao, Ramon Durazo-Arvizu, Amy Luke

Abstract

Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is known as an independent predictor of cardiometabolic risk and all-cause mortality, while increased physical activity has been shown to improve cardiometabolic risk. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether or not there is an association between objectively-measured physical activity and VAT in a community-based cohort of African-American adults, a population at higher-than-average risk for cardiometabolic diseases. Free-living physical activity was quantified using accelerometry while VAT and abdominal subcutaneous fat were estimated using dual x-ray absorptiometry in a cohort of African Americans, ages 30-50 years, enrolled in the Modeling the Epidemiologic Transition Study. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the degree of association comparing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), vigorous activity, and sedentary behavior with measures of central adiposity including VAT, subcutaneous fat, and waist circumference. A total of 271 individuals with complete data were included in the analyses. Women, on average, had significantly more VAT and abdominal subcutaneous fat than men. There were statistically significant inverse univariate correlations between MVPA and measures of abdominal adiposity (-0.30, p < 0.001) and activity counts and adiposity (-0.31, p < 0.001) among both sexes. These significant associations remained after controlling for age, sex, and smoking status; neither alcohol consumption nor employment status were associated with abdominal adiposity. Time in sedentary behavior was not meaningfully associated with central adiposity in either sex (women: -0.02, p = 0.79; men: -0.21, p = 0.04). To our knowledge, this study is the first to identify significant inverse associations between MVPA and measures of central adiposity among African American adults from a community-based cohort using an objective measure of physical activity and a validated quantitative imaging technique.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 6 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Philosophy 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 9 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,706,942
of 12,140,050 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#124
of 152 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#205,275
of 283,044 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,140,050 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 152 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,044 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.