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Use of tuberculin skin test for assessment of immune recovery among previously malnourished children in Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Use of tuberculin skin test for assessment of immune recovery among previously malnourished children in Ethiopia
Published in
BMC Research Notes, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-017-2909-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paluku Bahwere, Philip James, Alemseged Abdissa, Yesufe Getu, Yilak Getnet, Kate Sadler, Tsinuel Girma

Abstract

To compare levels of immunity in children recovering from severe acute malnutrition (cases) against those of community controls (controls). At baseline children recovering from severe acute malnutrition had lower, mid upper arm circumference (122 mm for cases and 135 mm for controls; p < 0.001), weight-for-height Z-score (- 1.0 for cases and - 0.5 for controls; p < 0.001), weight-for-age Z-score (- 2.8 for cases and - 1.1 for controls; p < 0.001) and height/length-for-age Z-score (- 3.6 for cases and - 1.4 for controls; p < 0.001), than controls. Age and gender matched community controls. At baseline, prevalence of a positive tuberculin skin test, assessed by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction skin test, was very low in both cases (3/93 = 3.2%) and controls (2/94 = 2.1%) and did not significantly increase at 6 months follow up (6/86 = 7.0% in cases and 3/84 = 3.4% in controls). The incidences of common childhood morbidities, namely fever, diarrhoea and cough, were 1.7-1.8 times higher among cases than controls. In conclusion, these results show that tuberculin skin test does not enable any conclusive statements regarding the immune status of patients following treatment for severe acute malnutrition. The increased incidence of infection in cases compared to controls suggests persistence of lower resistance to infection even after anthropometric recovery is achieved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 14 42%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 7 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 15 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,501,539
of 13,118,813 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#235
of 2,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,670
of 310,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#25
of 404 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,118,813 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,966 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,122 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 404 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.