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Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis associated with sunitinib and a literature review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, November 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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18 Mendeley
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Title
Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis associated with sunitinib and a literature review
Published in
BMC Cancer, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3744-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yong Suk Lee, Jae Joon Han, Si-Young Kim, Chi Hoon Maeng

Abstract

Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) is a rare self-limiting condition characterized by air-filled cysts within intestinal walls. Diagnosis should be prudent because it can mimic pneumoperitoneum leading to unnecessary treatment such as surgical exploration. Although various drugs including anti-neoplastic agents have been suggested as etiologies, cases related to sunitinib are sparse. Because of the rarity of this unusual side effect by sunitinib, we report the case report. A 68-year-old female with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor who was treated with sunitinb for 4 months visited to our hospital complaining of severe diarrhea and mild abdominal discomfort. The abdominal X-ray showed subdiaphragmatic air mimicking intestinal perforation. After the meticulous evaluation including abdomino-pelvic computed tomography, the patient was diagnosed of PCI induced by sunitinib and fully recovered with conservative management. It is important to note that PCI can develop after treatment with sunitinib because PCI has not been widely known as an adverse event caused by the agent. Furthemore, emergent surgery while sunitinib was administrated without adequate washout period can result in substantial surgical complications which could be avoided with the precise diagnosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 4 22%
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 1 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 5 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 67%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2019.
All research outputs
#11,853,645
of 15,534,776 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#3,377
of 5,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,310
of 320,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#289
of 507 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,534,776 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,809 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 320,450 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 507 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.