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Improving adherence in mental health service users with severe mental illness in South Africa: a pilot randomized controlled trial of a treatment partner and text message intervention vs. treatment…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, November 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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117 Mendeley
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Title
Improving adherence in mental health service users with severe mental illness in South Africa: a pilot randomized controlled trial of a treatment partner and text message intervention vs. treatment as usual
Published in
BMC Research Notes, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-017-2915-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Goodman Sibeko, Henk Temmingh, Sumaya Mall, Peter Williams-Ashman, Graham Thornicroft, Ezra S. Susser, Crick Lund, Dan J. Stein, Peter D. Milligan

Abstract

Medication non-adherence is a significant problem in treatment of severe mental disorders and is associated with poor clinical outcomes and increased demand on services. Task-shifting interventions incorporating mobile health may improve adherence in mental health service users in low- and middle-income countries. Seventy-seven participants were recruited from a psychiatric hospital in Cape Town, with 42 randomized to receive the intervention and 35 to treatment as usual. Intervention pairs underwent treatment-partner contracting and psychoeducation, and received monthly text message reminders of clinic appointments. Primary outcomes were intervention acceptability and feasibility. Secondary outcome for efficacy were adherence to clinic visit; relapse; quality of life; symptomatic relief and medication adherence. Treatment partner and psychoeducation components were acceptable and feasible. The text message component was acceptable but not feasible in its current form. Efficacy outcomes favoured the intervention but did not reach statistical significance. A treatment-partner intervention is acceptable and feasible in a low- and middle-income setting. Work is needed to ensure that additional components of such interventions are tailored to the local context. Appropriately powered efficacy studies are needed. Trial Registration PACTR PACTR201610001830190, Registered 21 October 2016 (Retrospectively registered).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 117 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 117 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 21%
Student > Bachelor 14 12%
Researcher 13 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 20 17%
Unknown 27 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 22 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 19%
Psychology 18 15%
Social Sciences 5 4%
Computer Science 4 3%
Other 12 10%
Unknown 34 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 November 2017.
All research outputs
#10,761,090
of 18,434,942 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,519
of 3,810 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,072
of 330,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#143
of 421 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,434,942 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,810 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,105 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 421 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.